The Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Teens in America, A Common Sense Media Research Study, United States, 2015 (ICPSR 38018)

Version Date: Jun 21, 2021 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Vicky Rideout, VJR Consulting

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR38018.v1

Version V1

These data are from a nationally representative, probability-based, and cross-sectional online survey that was taken by participants ages 8-18 in 2015. The goal of this Common Sense research study was to present a big-picture look at the large trends and patterns of media usage among tweens (ages 8- to 12-years-old) and teenagers (ages 13- to 18-years-old) in the United States. Participants answered questions about media use, including the level of enjoyment, frequency of use, and amount of time devoted to a wide array of screen-based activities (watching TV shows, playing video games, and using social media) and non-screen-based media activities (reading and listening to music). For screen-based media activities, participants also answered questions about the devices they use (computers, smartphones, and tablets). Demographics include age, household income, parent education, race/ethnicity, gender, household size, and parent/caregiver employment status.

Rideout, Vicky. The Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Teens in America, A Common Sense Media Research Study, United States, 2015. [distributor], 2021-06-21. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR38018.v1

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2015
2015-02-06 -- 2015-03-09
  1. For additional information on the Common Sense Census: Media Use by Tweens and Teens study, please visit Common Sense Media website.
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The goal of this Common Sense research study was to present a big-picture look at the large trends and patterns of media usage among tweens (ages 8- to 12-years-old) and teenagers (ages 13- to 18-years-old) in the United States.

This report is based on a nationally representative survey of 2,658 U.S. children age 8 to 18 years old, conducted from February 6 to March 9, 2015. The survey was administered by GfK, using their KnowledgePanel, a probability-based Web panel designed to be representative of the United States. A full explanation of the methodology, including definitions of the various types of media included in the survey and information on how time spent with media was measured and reported, is available in the report.

Data is from a nationally representative, probability-based cross-sectional survey of 2,658 8- to 18-year-olds in the United States. Members of the panel were randomly recruited to participate using address-based sampling and random-digit-dial telephone surveys. Households that were not already online were provided with notebook computers and dial-up Internet access for the purpose of participating. The survey questionnaire was offered in English and Spanish. When asked to report media use, participants were asked to think of media use from the previous day.

Cross-sectional

Children and teens in the United States who are between the ages of 8 to 18.

Individual

Participants answered questions about media use, including the level of enjoyment, frequency of use, and amount of time devoted to a wide array of screen-based activities (watching TV shows, playing video games, and using social media) and non-screen-based media activities (reading and listening to music). For screen-based media activities, participants also answered questions about the devices they use (computers, smartphones, and tablets). Demographics include age, household income, parent education, race/ethnicity, gender, household size, and parent/caregiver employment status.

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This collection contains two weight variables: WEIGHT1 (Sample weights for all qualified respondents), and WEIGHT2 (Sample weights for all qualified respondents per race/ethnicity group).

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Notes

  • Curation and dissemination of this study is provided by the institutional members of ICPSR, and data is available only to users at ICPSR member institutions. To determine if you are at a member institution, check the list of ICPSR member institutions, or learn more about becoming a member.