Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED) 2020: Supplemental Survey, United States (ICPSR 37921)

Version Date: Feb 2, 2021 View help for published

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Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.)

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37921.v1

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  • V2 [2021-02-11]
  • V1 [2021-02-02] unpublished

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Additional information may be available in Collection Notes.

For more information, please visit the Federal Reserve Board's website.

SHED 2020

Since 2013, the Federal Reserve Board has conducted the Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED), which measures the economic well-being of U.S. households and identifies potential risks to their finances. The survey includes modules on a range of topics of current relevance to financial well-being including credit access and behaviors, savings, retirement, economic fragility, and education and student loans. The Board's seventh annual SHED examines the economic well-being and financial lives of U.S. adults and their families. The 2019 complete survey was conducted in October 2019, offering a picture of personal finances prior to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. To obtain updated information in the midst of closures and stay-at-home orders, a smaller supplemental survey was conducted in April 2020, focusing on labor market effects and households' overall financial circumstances at that time. Demographic variables include age, level of education, gender, race, household income, and marital status. Users can use the industry information included in the data to obtain a perspective on financial conditions resulting from COVID-19 for individuals who work in arts and culture related fields.

Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.). Survey of Household Economics and Decisionmaking (SHED) 2020: Supplemental Survey, United States. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2021-02-02. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37921.v1

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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2020-04-03 -- 2020-04-06
2020-04-03 -- 2020-04-06
For more information, please visit the Federal Reserve Board's website.
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This study measures the economic well-being of U.S. households and identifies potential risks to their finances. The survey includes modules on a range of topics of current relevance to financial well-being including credit access and behaviors, savings, retirement, economic fragility, and education and student loans. To obtain updated information in the midst of closures and stay-at-home orders, a smaller supplemental survey was conducted in April 2020, focusing on labor market effects and households' overall financial circumstances at that time.

The April 2020 survey included 13 questions and was fielded from April 3 through April 6. This survey was also fielded using the Ipsos Knowledge Panel. As such, the same sampling and weighting approaches apply to this survey as applied for the main SHED survey conducted in the fall. However, the sample size, survey length, and incentive structure differed from the main SHED survey. The respondents to the April supplement were drawn from the entire Knowledge Panel and typically did not also complete the fall survey.

The SHED sample was designed to be representative of adults age 18 and older living in the United States. Because the sample size was large enough to obtain sufficient coverage of low-income populations without an oversample, unlike previous years the 2019 survey did not include a low-income oversample. The Ipsos methodology for selecting a general population sample from Knowledge Panel ensured that the resulting sample behaved as an equal probability of selection method (EPSEM) sample. This methodology started by weighting the entire Knowledge Panel to the benchmarks in the latest March supplement of the Current Population Survey along several geo-demographic dimensions. This way, the weighted distribution of the Knowledge Panel matched that of U.S. adults.

Cross-sectional

Adults age 18 and older living in the United States

Individual
survey data

This study includes variables that ask about respondents' financial situations, their jobs, and demographics, such as race, age, gender, and educational level.

Of the 2,853 panel members contacted to take the survey, 1,030 participated, yielding a final stage completion rate of 36.1 percent.

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2021-02-02

2021-02-02 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.
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The WEIGHT variable allows for the entire sample to reflect the observable characteristics of the U.S. adult population. It is rescaled to add up to the total population of the U.S. adults eligible for this survey. WEIGHT is for analysis of the combined sample comprised of the main sample and the lower-income oversample. It is scaled to add up to the number of completed responses.

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