American Time Use Survey (ATUS): Arts Activities, [United States], 2003-2018 (ICPSR 36268)

Version Date: May 20, 2020 View help for published

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United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36268.v5

Version V5 ()

  • V6 [2022-04-07]
  • V5 [2020-05-20] unpublished
  • V4 [2019-05-01] unpublished
  • V3 [2016-11-28] unpublished

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Additional information may be available in Collection Notes.

The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau who collects and processes the data.

NADAC also includes unpublished ATUS summary tables produced by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. These tables provide data for years 2010-2014 and for years 2011-2015. The tables show numbers of Americans participating on any given day and average time spent on an activity. The 2010-2014 summary tables contain both national and state level data. The 2011-2015 tables contain national data only.

Users can find statistics for arts-related activities in the Tier 1 categories "Socializing, Relaxing and Leisure" and "Sports, Exercise, and Recreation."

Before analyzing the data, users are strongly encouraged to refer to the ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide (produced by the Census Bureau), which contains detailed explanations regarding study design, sampling frame used, data coding and editing, weights, and response rates.

Although some demographic variables are updated during the ATUS interview, most of this information comes from earlier CPS interviews, as the ATUS sample is drawn from a subset of households that have completed month 8 of the CPS.

The activity code variables for this data collection are preceded by the letter "T" and include a six-digit activity classification code. Activity classification codes and examples can be found in the 2003-2018 ATUS Activity Lexicon section in the ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide. The first two digits represent the Tier 1 category, the middle two digits represent the Tier 2 category, and the final two digits represent the unique, specific activity within those categories.

While attempts have been made to collect the most accurate data possible, the ATUS data do have limitations. With the exception of childcare, information on secondary activities (activities that are done at the same time as the primary activity) is not collected. This could lead to underestimates of the amount of time people spend doing activities that are frequently done in combination with other activities. For example, ATUS estimates likely underestimate the amount of time people spend listening to music since so many people listen to music while doing other things.

Survey estimates are subject to non-sampling errors that may arise from many different sources, such as an inability to obtain information from all individuals in the sample, data entry errors, coding errors, and misinterpretation of definitions. Errors also could occur if non-response is correlated with time use. Non-sampling errors were not measured. However, the Census Bureau uses quality-assurance procedures to minimize non-sampling, data entry, and coding errors in the survey estimates. Please refer to Chapters 7 and 10 of the ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide for further details.

Please see the Burea of Labor Statistic's website for more information regarding the American Time Use Survey.

ATUS: Arts Activities, 2003-2018

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the Nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. This multi-year data collection contains information on the amount of time (in minutes) that people spent doing various activities in the years 2003 through 2018, and asks about a much broader range of topics covered than just what is in this study, which focuses on arts activities. But this particular study focuses solely upon the time spent on a given day in all types of activity.

For this data collection, 201,151 respondents were randomly selected from a subset of households that completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). Only one respondent per household, aged 15 or older, was randomly selected to participate. Respondents were interviewed one time about how they spent their time on the previous day starting at 4:00 a.m. and ending at 4:00 a.m. on the interview day.

The ATUS classifies activities into 18 Tier 1 categories. Each Tier 1 category contains multiple Tier 2 categories providing a second level of classification. Overall there are 96 Tier 2 categories with the average being 5 sub-classifications per Tier 1 category. In total, the ATUS contains 424 unique activity codes designated by a six digit classification code.

Additionally, the study provides demographic information--including sex, age, ethnicity, race, education, employment, and children in the household.

United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics. American Time Use Survey (ATUS): Arts Activities, [United States], 2003-2018. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2020-05-20. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36268.v5

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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2003 -- 2018
2003 -- 2018

The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau who collects and processes the data.

NADAC also includes unpublished ATUS summary tables produced by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. These tables provide data for years 2010-2014 and for years 2011-2015. The tables show numbers of Americans participating on any given day and average time spent on an activity. The 2010-2014 summary tables contain both national and state level data. The 2011-2015 tables contain national data only.

Users can find statistics for arts-related activities in the Tier 1 categories "Socializing, Relaxing and Leisure" and "Sports, Exercise, and Recreation."

Before analyzing the data, users are strongly encouraged to refer to the ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide (produced by the Census Bureau), which contains detailed explanations regarding study design, sampling frame used, data coding and editing, weights, and response rates.

Although some demographic variables are updated during the ATUS interview, most of this information comes from earlier CPS interviews, as the ATUS sample is drawn from a subset of households that have completed month 8 of the CPS.

The activity code variables for this data collection are preceded by the letter "T" and include a six-digit activity classification code. Activity classification codes and examples can be found in the 2003-2018 ATUS Activity Lexicon section in the ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide. The first two digits represent the Tier 1 category, the middle two digits represent the Tier 2 category, and the final two digits represent the unique, specific activity within those categories.

While attempts have been made to collect the most accurate data possible, the ATUS data do have limitations. With the exception of childcare, information on secondary activities (activities that are done at the same time as the primary activity) is not collected. This could lead to underestimates of the amount of time people spend doing activities that are frequently done in combination with other activities. For example, ATUS estimates likely underestimate the amount of time people spend listening to music since so many people listen to music while doing other things.

Survey estimates are subject to non-sampling errors that may arise from many different sources, such as an inability to obtain information from all individuals in the sample, data entry errors, coding errors, and misinterpretation of definitions. Errors also could occur if non-response is correlated with time use. Non-sampling errors were not measured. However, the Census Bureau uses quality-assurance procedures to minimize non-sampling, data entry, and coding errors in the survey estimates. Please refer to Chapters 7 and 10 of the ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide for further details.

Please see the Burea of Labor Statistic's website for more information regarding the American Time Use Survey.
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The primary purpose of this data collection is to develop nationally representative estimates (in minutes) of how people spend their time on any given day.

Between the years 2003-2018 201,151 respondents completed the ATUS survey. The survey results are based on computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) with a representative sample of residents living in households in the United States that are at least 15 years of age, with the exception of active military personnel and people residing in institutions such as nursing homes and prisons.

For additional details on the study design please refer to chapter 3 within the User Guide sub-section portion of the larger ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide document.

The sample for this data collection was drawn from households that had completed their final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). The ATUS utilizes a stratified three-stage sampling approach. The first stage is at the state level so that the sample is in the same proportion as to the proportion of the population of that state compared to the population of the country. The second stage of the sample is selection at the household level stratified by key demographics. The third stage is selection of the respondent within the household.

Longitudinal: Trend / Repeated Cross-section

All residents living in households in the United States that are at least 15 years of age, with the exception of active military personnel and people residing in institutions such as nursing homes and prisons.

Individual
survey data

Variables for this data collection provide information about the amount of time (in minutes) people spend doing various activities for any given 24-hour period. The period in question is from 4:00 am the day preceding the interview up through 4:00 am the day of the interview. Activities are classified into 18 Tier 1 categories which include:

  • Personal care
  • Household activities
  • Caring for and helping household members
  • Caring for and helping non-household members
  • Work and work related activites
  • Education
  • Consumer purchases
  • Professional and personal care services
  • Household services
  • Government services and civic obligations
  • Eating and drinking
  • Socializing, relaxing, and leisure
  • Sports, exercise, and recreation
  • Religious and spiritual activities
  • Volunteer activities
  • Telephone calls
  • Traveling
  • Unable to classify

There are a total of 424 unique activity codes in Dataset 1 and listed in the ATUS Activity Lexicon 2003-2018 portion of the User Guide document. Dataset 1 also contains additional demographic variables such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, education, employment, and children in the household. Additionally, there are two variables that designate what day of the week the interview took place on and whether or not that day was a holiday or not.

The average response rate to the ATUS from 2003-2018 was 53.1 percent. The response rate for each year from 2003 through 2018 are as follows:

  • 2003: 57.8 percent
  • 2004: 57.3 percent
  • 2005: 56.6 percent
  • 2006: 55.1 percent
  • 2007: 52.5 percent
  • 2008: 54.6 percent
  • 2009: 56.6 percent
  • 2010: 56.9 percent
  • 2011: 54.6 percent
  • 2012: 53.2 percent
  • 2013: 49.9 percent
  • 2014: 51.0 percent
  • 2015: 48.5 percent
  • 2016: 46.8 percent
  • 2017: 45.6 percent
  • 2018: 43.3 percent

For additional information on how response rates were calculated please refer to section 3.6 within the User Guide sub-section portion of the larger ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide document.

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2015-09-08

2020-05-20 Updated to include 2018 data, as well as adding online analysis.

2019-05-01 Data through 2017 were added to the data collection.

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • United States. Bureau of Labor Statistics. American Time Use Survey (ATUS): Arts Activities, [United States], 2003-2018. ICPSR36268-v5. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2020-05-20. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36268.v5
2016-11-28

An infographic on TV watching for 2015 was added.

The 2010-2014 summary tables file was updated to create two files that include state-level summary tables. One file includes summary tables that provide percentages of time that the population spent doing selected activities and percentages of the population that did them. The second 2010-2014 summary tables file covers numbers of persons and average hours per day spent on each activity.

2016-10-20 Data for 2015 and unpublished ATUS summary tables for 2011-2015 (produced by the BLS) were added to the data collection.

2016-03-10 Unpublished ATUS summary tables produced by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics have been added to the data collection.

2015-09-08 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.
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The data contain the weight variable TUFNWGTP. This variable was created using the 2006 weighting method and is available for all years. Users need to apply weights when computing estimates with the ATUS data because simple tabulations of unweighted ATUS data produce misleading results.

The ATUS final weight(s) add up to the total number of person-days (not persons) in the population. Thus the sum of the weights for an annual file would add up to 365 days times the United States (civilian non-institutional) population aged 15 and older.

This study also contains a separate Replicate Weights File which contains the replicate weights for variable TUFNWGTP. These weights were created using the 2006 weighting method. The data file contains one record for each respondent to the ATUS. These replicate weights are necessary for constructing standard error estimates. To use these weights, merge the Replicate Weights File to the Activity Summary File using the ID variable TUCASEID.

For additional information on weighting please refer to chapter 7 within the User Guide sub-section portion of the larger ATUS 2003-2018 User Guide document.

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