Annual Health Survey (AHS), India, 2007-2012 (ICPSR 38097)

Version Date: Apr 13, 2022 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Diane Coffey, The University of Texas at Austin; r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics.; Nathan Franz, The University of Texas at Austin; r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics.; Samuel Arenberg, The University of Texas at Austin; Minle Xu, The University of Texas at Austin; Sangita Vyas, The University of Texas at Austin; r.i.c.e., a research institute for compassionate economics.

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR38097.v2

Version V2 ()

  • V2 [2022-04-13]
  • V1 [2022-04-06] unpublished

The Annual Health Survey (AHS), conducted by the Government of India between July 2010 and May 2013, investigates maternal and child health in nine states: Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Orissa, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand, and Uttar Pradesh. These states constitute about 70 percent of neonatal deaths in India and about one-in-five neonatal deaths globally. The AHS consists of a three-round panel that interviewed over 4 million households in each round, as well as a one-time Clinical, Anthropometric, and Bio-Chemical Survey (CAB). The data were originally released to the public in 2015 as a set of 45 .csv files. The .csv files are included in a restricted-use zipped package as part of the ICPSR release (see dataset 21).

The survey focused on topics such as household composition, caste, fertility, family planning, pre- and post-natal care, breastfeeding, infant mortality, illness, disease, disability, and health care practices. Demographic information includes sex, age, education, occupation, marital status, household size, and religion. The CAB files contain biometric data including but not limited to height, weight, blood pressure, hemoglobin, pulse, and blood glucose.

Potential data users should note that the public-use and restricted-use versions of the datasets are the same except for the masking of day component variables for certain dates in the public-use versions of the files (please see the Description of Variables section for full details). Therefore, only researchers with a limited set of research questions that require full birth, marriage, and death dates will need to apply for the restricted-use versions of the data files.

Additionally, because the final data files are very large and potentially very time consuming to analyze on personal computers, researchers have the option to download ten-percent samples of each file (see datasets 3, 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, 15, 16, 19, and 20). These samples contain the same variables as the original files but only ten percent of the records. The samples were determined by taking a randomly selected ten percent of households in each district. P.I. codebooks were not produced for these samples. Please note that the ten-percent samples for each dataset were selected independently, so it is not advised to merge across datasets within the AHS using these samples, as the match rates will be very low.

Coffey, Diane, Franz, Nathan, Arenberg, Samuel, Xu, Minle, and Vyas, Sangita. Annual Health Survey (AHS), India, 2007-2012. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2022-04-13. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR38097.v2

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United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R03HD098292)

District

These data may not be used for any purpose other than statistical reporting and analysis. Use of these data to learn the identity of any person or establishment is strictly prohibited. To protect respondent privacy, certain files within this data collection are restricted from general dissemination. To obtain these files, researchers must agree to the terms and conditions of a Restricted Data Use Agreement in accordance with existing ICPSR servicing policies.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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2007 -- 2012
2010-07-01 -- 2011-03-31 (AHS panel Round 1), 2011-10-01 -- 2012-04-30 (AHS panel Round 2), 2012-11-01 -- 2013-05-31 (AHS panel Round 3), 2013-10-01 -- 2014-12-31 (CAB survey)
  1. The Annual Health Survey was conducted by the Government of India between July of 2010 and May of 2013. The data were originally released to the public in 2015 as a set of 45 .csv files. These .csv files are included in a restricted-use zipped package as part of the ICPSR release (see dataset 21).

    The University of Texas at Austin assembled the publicly available microdata, constructed the necessary identifiers, and cleaned the data. The user-friendly versions of the constituent datasets are provided by ICPSR as public and restricted-use datasets 1 through 20. For ease of use, ICPSR has retained the folder structure of the deposited .csv files and the Stata (.do) syntax files used to create the user-friendly versions of the files; therefore, the .csv files and .do files are provided together in the dataset 21 restricted-use zipped package. For users working with the public-use datasets, only the Stata (.do) syntax files are available for reference in the dataset 21 zipped package.

    The Users' Guide describes how the final datasets were constructed from the original files released by the Government of India's Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, what information the final datasets contain, how to use the panel structure of the data, how to link the different datasets together, as well as some of the limitations of the data. Please see the Users' Guide for additional information about the user-friendly datasets, as well as detailed guidance regarding use of the Stata (.do) syntax and .csv files.

  2. The public-use and restricted-use versions of the datasets are the same except for the masking of day component variables for certain dates in the public-use versions of the files (please see the Description of Variables section for full details). Therefore, only researchers with a limited set of research questions that require full birth, marriage, and death dates will need to apply for the restricted-use versions of the data files.

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The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of the National Rural Health Mission, which launched in 2005 and featured several changes to the provision of maternal and child health in India.

The Annual Health Survey (AHS) was conducted for three years between 2010-2013. For the AHS study, population listing, sample selection, and field protocols were used to collect samples. For this survey, data were collected using questionnaires from three rounds. In the first round (known as the baseline study), household that were selected in the survey were asked to complete four schedules (questionnaires), which are the Household Schedule, Household-Listing Schedule, Woman Schedule, and Mortality Schedule.

The Clinical, Anthropometric, and Bio-Chemical Survey (CAB) is a cross sectional survey that visited different households than the ones that were interviewed in the AHS Panel. The CAB collected anthropometric data, as well as blood pressure and blood samples to measure glucose and hemoglobin. The CAB was collected in 2014.

The Sample design adopted for Annual Health Survey is a uni-stage stratified simple random sample without replacement except in case of larger villages in rural areas (population more than or equal to 2,000 as per the 2001 Census), wherein a two stage stratified sampling has been applied. The sample units are Census Enumeration Blocks (CEBs) in urban areas and villages in rural areas. In rural areas, the villages have been divided into two strata.

Stratum I comprises villages with population less than 2,000 and Stratum II contains villages with population 2,000 or more. Smaller villages with population less than 200 were excluded from the sampling frame in such a manner that the total population of villages so excluded did not exceed 2 per cent of the total population of the district. In case of Stratum I, the entire village is the sample unit. In case of Stratum II, the village has been divided into mutually exclusive (non-overlapping) and geographically contiguous units comprising group of EBs called segments of more or less equal size and population not exceeding 2,000 in any case. One segment from the frame of segments thus prepared was selected in a random manner to represent the selected village at the second stage of sampling.

The number of sample villages in each district was allocated between the two strata proportionally to their size (population). The villages within each size stratum were further ordered by the female literacy rate based on the Census 2001 data, and three disjoint and equal size substrata were established. The sample villages within each substratum were selected by simple random sampling without replacement. Similarly, in urban areas, the CEBs within a district were ordered by the female literacy rate based on the Census 2001 data, and three disjoint and equal size substrata were established. The sample CEBs within each substratum were selected by simple random sampling without replacement. Thus, female literacy which has a direct bearing on the fertility behavior was used for implicit stratification.

Longitudinal: Panel

Individuals and households in the Indian states of Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, and Uttarakhand.

Individual, Household

Public-use and restricted-use versions of the COMB, WOMAN, WPS, MORT, and CAB datasets are the same except for the masking of day component variables for full dates in the public-use versions of the files:

  • DS1 and DS3: Variables DATE_OF_BIRTH (day) and DATE_OF_MARRIAGE (day) are masked in the public-use COMB files.
  • DS5 and DS7: Variables DATE_OF_BIRTH (day) and DATE_OF_MARRIAGE (day) are masked in the public-use WOMAN files.
  • DS9 and DS11: Variables DOB (day-child), DATE_OF_BIRTH (day-mother), and DATE_OF_MARRIAGE (day) are masked in the public-use WPS files.
  • DS13 and DS15: Variables DATE_OF_DEATH (day), DATE_OF_BIRTH (day), and DATE_OF_MARRIAGE (day) are masked in the public-use MORT files.
  • DS17 and DS19: Variable DATE_OF_BIRTH (day) is masked in the public-use CAB files.
Therefore, only researchers with a limited set of research questions that require full birth, marriage, and death dates will need to apply for the restricted-use versions of the data files.

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2022-04-06

2022-04-13 Updated P.I. information in public and restricted-use documentation files. Updated DS1 and DS2 to include R data files.

2022-04-06 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.
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The three strata in the AHS panel are large villages (population greater than or equal to 2,000 as per the 2001 Census), small villages (population less than 2,000 as per the 2001 Census), and urban areas, where Census Enumeration Blocks acted as primary sampling units. Within each district, weights are stratum-specific; that is, observations in a given district have one of three unique weights that correspond to whether the observation is from a large village, a small village or an urban area. These weights should be applied when computing district- or region-level statistics.

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Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

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This study was originally processed, archived, and disseminated by Data Sharing for Demographic Research (DSDR), a project funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).