The Challenge and Promise of Using Community Policing Strategies to Prevent Violent Extremism, United States, 2014 (ICPSR 36460)

Published: Mar 7, 2018

Principal Investigator(s):
David Schanzer, Duke University; Charles Kurzman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36460.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The study contains data from a survey of 480 large (200+ sworn officers) state and local law enforcement agencies, and 63 additional smaller county and municipal agencies that experienced violent extremism. These data were collected as part of a project to perform a comprehensive assessment of challenges and opportunities when developing partnerships between police and communities to counter violent extremism. Qualitative data collected as a part of this project are not included in this release.

This collection includes one tab-delimited data file: "file6-NIJ-2012-3163-Survey-Responses.csv" with 194 variables and 382 cases.

The Challenge and Promise of Using Community Policing Strategies to Prevent Violent Extremism, United States, 2014. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-03-07. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36460.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2012-ZA-BX-0002)

None

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

2014

2014

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

Qualitative data are not available as part of this collection.

The purpose of this study was to identify how law enforcement agencies throughout the country were engaging with communities who may have had members at risk of recruitment to violent extremism, in order to promote public safety and protect national security.

This study had three elements:

  • A survey of 480 state and local law enforcement agencies across the United States with 200+ sworn officers, and 63 additional smaller county and municipal agencies that experienced an incident or prosecution for violent extremism in recent years
  • Telephone interviews with 18 municipal and county law enforcement agencies across the United States
  • Site visits to local law enforcement jurisdictions across the United States resulting in more than 50 interviews, and site visits to 18 Muslim American community organizations and focus groups across the United States.

Data from elements two and three are not released with this study.

Law enforcement survey: The sampling frame was all 480 state, county, and municipal law enforcement agencies with more than 200 sworn officers, plus 63 additional county and municipal agencies with 200 or fewer sworn officers in selected jurisdictions that experienced an incident or prosecution for violent extremism in recent years.

The survey yielded responses from 339 of the larger agencies (a 71 percent response rate) and 43 of the smaller agencies (a 68 percent response rate), for a total of 382 law enforcement agencies (a 70 percent response rate), including 35 state agencies, 141 county agencies, and 206 municipal agencies, whose combined jurisdictions cover 86 percent of the U.S. population.

Cross-sectional

State, county, and municipal law enforcement agencies across the United States.

Individuals

survey data

The study features a single data file (NIJ-2012-3163-Survey-Responses.csv) comprised of 194 variables and 382 cases.

The variables relate to:

  • Identification of violent extremism threats and current strategies to address those threats
  • The use of community policing strategies to counter violent extremism and identify potential barriers.

Survey response rate: 70 percent.

Several Likert-type scales were used.

2018-03-07

2018-03-07

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.