Impact of the NYC Sugar Sweetened Beverage Policy on Calories Purchased and Consumed: Data on Fast Food Purchases, Dietary Patterns, and Retail Beverage Environments in New York City, Newark, and Jersey City, 2013-2014 (ICPSR 37143)

Version Date: Oct 15, 2018 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Brian Elbel, New York University. School of Medicine

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37143.v1

Version V1

The current collection includes data collected as part of a planned evaluation of New York City's proposed soda portion cap policy. Baseline data collection was conducted in three waves. Wave 1 began in early January 2013 and ended in April 2013; Wave 2 was conducted from August to November 2013; and Wave 3 was conducted between January and June 2014.

Data was collected at point-of-purchase on the availability, sizing, promotion, and cost of beverages in the fast food restaurants of New York City, New York and of Newark and Jersey City in New Jersey. This data was also collected in these areas for their nearest convenience stores/bodegas and supermarkets. Consumer receipts were also gathered to supplement this survey data. Additional data collection was conducted using environmental scans of fast food and grocery store locations to evaluate the healthfulness of the beverage environment. Lastly, some participants also completed a telephone interview where data was gathered on participant's dietary recall.

These data are intended to gather a fuller picture of the factors that may influence beverage purchases.

Elbel, Brian. Impact of the NYC Sugar Sweetened Beverage Policy on Calories Purchased and Consumed: Data on Fast Food Purchases, Dietary Patterns, and Retail Beverage Environments in New York City, Newark, and Jersey City, 2013-2014. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-10-15. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37143.v1

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Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (70823), New York State Health Foundation (12-01682), United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (R01DK099241)

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2013 -- 2014
2013-01 -- 2013-04 (Wave 1), 2013-08 -- 2013-11 (Wave 2), 2014-01 -- 2014-06 (Wave 3)

Data from the point-of-purchase survey dataset, point-of-purchase receipt dataset, and the dietary recall dataset can be merged utilizing the receipt identifier variable, RECEIPTID. The data can also be merged with the environmental scan datasets by utilizing the NEMS location variable, NEMSLOCATIONINDICATOR.

The point-of-purchase and dietary recall datasets need to be merged first before merging them to store environmental scans as those datasets do not have the NEMS location variable needed to merge to store-level datasets.

This data was collected as part of a planned evaluation of New York City's proposed soda portion policy (Sugary Drinks Portion Cap Rule).

Baseline data collection for this study was conducted in three waves: Wave 1 began in early January 2013 and ended in April 2013; Wave 2 was conducted from August to November 2013; and Wave 3 was conducted between January and June 2014.

For the first wave, data collectors stood outside identified fast food venues and recruited costumers to participate in the survey and collected their receipts (receipts for gift cards, happy meal toys, or other non-food items did not qualify for participation). Interviewers visited each location for three hours during lunch and dinner times. Data from this wave is contained in datasets one (survey data) and two (receipt data).

For the second wave, researchers visited 40 restaurants, convenience stores, and supermarkets to conduct environmental scans (some stores and restaurants were visited multiple times to evaluate inter-rater reliability). Scans were completed using a version of the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey (NEMS) environmental scan, created to assess the retail environment specific to beverages (NEMS-B). The NEMS data is contained in datasets three (fast food and convenience store NEMS data) and four (grocery store NEMS data)

For the third wave, 1,000 participants from the original point-of-purchase survey who volunteered to continue, participated in phone interviews regarding dietary recall. Data were collected using a free, online multi-pass dietary recall program developed by the National Cancer Institute, called ASA24: Automated Self-administered 24-hour Recall. This data is found in dataset five (dietary recall data)

Newark and Jersey City were selected as comparison cities for New York City through a method that assessed the degree of similarity between observations (in this case, cities) with regard to a set of demographic characteristics.

The five restaurant chains with the largest presence in New York City and Newark (Burger King, KFC, McDonald's, Subway, and Wendy's) were studied in each data collection period.

Neighborhoods of New York City, Jersey City, and Newark with restaurants of the selected chains were matched based on population size, age, race/ethnicity, poverty level, obesity rate, and diabetes rate. Within these neighborhoods restaurant locations were matched by chain name and key structural and geographic characteristics that might affect customer mix, such as nearby public transportation stations and housing complexes. The sample included a disproportionate number of restaurant locations in low-income, high-minority neighborhoods.

Data collectors then approached all customers at the selected fast-food restaurants who appeared to be eighteen years or older as they entered. Customers were told that they could receive $2 for answering a few questions and providing their register receipt following their visit. Restaurants were surveyed during lunch and dinner hours.

Cross-sectional

Adult fast food consumers in the New York Metropolitan Area

Receipt level
event/transaction data, observational data, survey data

This study includes five data files. Each file is described below with its case count and variable count.

DS1: Point-of-Purchase Survey Data (12,227 cases, 184 variables) This dataset includes survey data gathered at the point-of-purchase locations

DS2: Point-of-Purchase Receipt Data (29,099 cases, 29 variables) Data in this dataset represent information gathered from receipts collected from participants at the point-of-purchase locations.

DS3: Fast Food and Convenience Store NEMS Data (319 cases, 1000 variables) Dataset three is made up of items from the NEMS environmental scans conducted at fast food restaurant and convenience store/bodega locations.

DS4: Grocery Store NEMS Data (156 cases, 147 variables) Dataset three is made up of items from the NEMS environmental scans conducted at gorcery store and supermarket locations.

DS5: Dietary Recall Data (39,002 cases, 117 variables) The dietary recall dataset includes items collected from completed a dietary recall telephone interview.

2018-10-15

2018-10-15 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

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This study is maintained and distributed by the Health and Medical Care Archive (HMCA). HMCA is the official data archive of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.