Raising Healthy Children, Seattle Metropolitan Area, 2004-2011 (ICPSR 37584)

Version Date: Mar 31, 2020 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Jennifer A. Bailey, University of Washington. Social Development Research Group

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37584.v1

Version V1

Raising Healthy Children, initially funded in 1993, is an etiologic study of the development of substance use, with a randomized test of a social development intervention to prevent drug misuse and promote positive youth development nested within it. The study originally included 1,040 individuals who were recruited from 10 schools in a suburban school district in the Northwest United States in 1993, when they were in first or second grade. This dataset is an extension of the original study and includes data collected when participants were ages 18, 21, and 24/25. These data focused on age 18 environmental risk and protective factors for substance misuse and addiction from family, school, peer, community, and individual domains, as well as tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use frequency at ages 18, 21, and 24. Of the 1,040 participants in the study, 494 consented to have their data archived. Demographic information collected includes race, sex, household income, and parent education level.

Bailey, Jennifer A. Raising Healthy Children, Seattle Metropolitan Area, 2004-2011. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2020-03-31. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37584.v1

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United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse (R01DA008093)

Access to certain data files in this collection is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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2004 -- 2011
2004 -- 2005, 2007 -- 2008, 2011
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Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition (DSM-IV) alcohol abuse and dependence diagnostic cutoffs and criterion counts (ages 21, 24/25), DSM-IV nicotine dependence diagnostic cutoffs and criterion counts (age 24/25) and Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence scores (age 24/25) were used to measure tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use frequency at ages 18, 21, and 24.

Participants were recruited into the original Raising Healthy Children study when they were in first or second grade at one of 10 public elementary schools in a suburban school district north of Seattle, Washington. The 10 schools were selected from among those in the district because they had student populations with the highest aggregate risk (e.g., percentage receiving free/reduced-price lunch programs, percentage with low scores on standardized achievement tests). Schools were matched on low-income status, ethnicity, single-parent families, low reading scores, high absenteeism, and mobility. One school from each matched pair was assigned randomly to either an intervention or control condition. In the first year, 938 parents of 1,239 eligible students provided written consent to participate in the study. In the second year, an additional 102 students were added from a second eligible pool of 131 new students at project schools, yielding a total sample of 1,040 students (75% of the eligible population). Students are evenly distributed across two age cohorts; the older cohort was in Grade 2 and the younger cohort was in Grade 1 at baseline.

All participants in the original elementary school sample were followed annually until age 25. Data were collected at ages 18, 21, and 24/25. About 88% of the original 1,040 participants was retained at each of these ages.

Longitudinal: Panel

Adults aged 18-25 within the United States that participated in the Raising Healthy Children (RHC) project beginning in Grade 1 or Grade 2.

Individual

Response rates ranged from 85 to 88 percent.

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Notes

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