Trajectories of Delinquency and the Juvenile Justice System Response: Collateral Consequences in Young Adulthood, Cook County, Illinois, 2011-2014 (ICPSR 37255)

Version Date: Jun 27, 2019 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Linda A. Teplin, Feinberg School of Medicine

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37255.v1

Version V1

NJP Juvenile Justice Experiences and Weapons-Related Injury

This collection includes data collected from a subsample of participants interviewed near the end of the thirteenth follow-up of the Northwestern Juvenile Project (NJP). NJP is a longitudinal assessment of alcohol, drug, and mental health service needs and outcomes of juvenile detainees. The thirteenth follow-up occurred approximately 16 years after the baseline interview. The subsample of participants received two additional modules that were added to the interview. These interview modules, the Juvenile Justice Experiences module and the Weapons-Related Injury module, retrospectively assessed behaviors and experiences during adolescence.

The original NJP sample included 1,829 randomly selected youth recruited at intake to the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center (CCJTDC) in Chicago, Illinois from 1995 to 1998. The sample was stratified by gender, race/ethnicity, age, and legal status (for a total of 13 strata) to obtain enough participants to examine key subgroups. Both additional modules were administered at follow-up thirteen to a subsample 389 participants.

The Juvenile Justice Experiences module assessed experiences with corrections in the juvenile justice system. Items were drawn from the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement (SYRP) which ask a series of questions covering an individual's emotion and mental states among youth who are in custody. NJP utilized a modified SYRP to assess juvenile justice experiences retrospectively among the sample.

The Weapons-Related Injury module was created for the NJP, and assesses gunshot-related and stabbing-related victimization during adolescence.

Teplin, Linda A. Trajectories of Delinquency and the Juvenile Justice System Response: Collateral Consequences in Young Adulthood, Cook County, Illinois, 2011-2014. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2019-06-27. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37255.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (2013-JF-FX-0057)

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Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement. Data are provided via ICPSR's Virtual Data Enclave (VDE). Apply for access to these data through the ICPSR VDE portal. Information and instructions are available within the data portal. For further assistance please reference the VDE Guide to learn about the application process, about using the VDE, and how to request disclosure review of VDE output.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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2011 -- 2014
2011 -- 2014
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All participants of NJP were scheduled for follow-up interviews approximately 16 years (Follow-up thirteen) after baseline. A total of 389 participants interviewed at the end of the 16 year follow-up interview received the two additional modules that make up these data.

Follow-up interviews for NJP were conducted face-to-face wherever the participant was living - in the community or in any correctional facility in Illinois - at the time their interview was due. However, community interviews were conducted by telephone if the participant live more than 2 hours away. Diagnostic modules were administered via PAPI or CAPI. Non-diagnostic modules were initially administered via PAPI; however beginning with NJP follow-up five, these modules were administered via CAPI. Due to the inclusion of additional variables, follow-up interviews were longer than baseline interviews and lasted 3 to 4 hours.

All detainees who were awaiting the adjudication or disposition of their case were eligible to participate in the NJP study. A stratified random sample of 1,829 youth at intake from Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center (CCJTDC) was recruited between November 20, 1995, and June 14, 1998. This baseline was stratified by gender, race/ethnicity (African American, non-Hispanic white, Hispanic, "other" race/ethnicity), age (10-13 years or 14+ years), and legal status (processed in juvenile or adult court) to obtain enough participants to examine key subgroups (e.g., females, Hispanics, younger persons). There were a total of 13 strata, as listed below. There were too few female detainees of each race/ethnicity and detainees identified as "other" race/ethnicity to further stratify these groups. Detainees aged 10 to 13 years were not stratified by legal status because they were generally too young to be considered for transfer to adult court.

Sampling Strata

  1. African American females
  2. Non-Hispanic white females
  3. Hispanic females
  4. African American males, aged 10-13 years
  5. Non-Hispanic white males, aged 10-13 years
  6. Hispanic males, aged 10-13 years
  7. African American males, 14 years or older and processed as adult transfer
  8. Non-Hispanic white males, 14 years or older and processed as adult transfer
  9. Hispanic males, 14 years or older and processed as adult transfer
  10. African American males, 14 years or older and processed as a juvenile
  11. Non-Hispanic white males, 14 years or older and processed as a juvenile
  12. Hispanic white males, 14 years or older and processed as a juvenile
  13. Other race/ethnicity

Detainees were classified in strata using information listed in the intake log. A study liaison sampled from the stratum in a pre-set order. If no participants were available for a stratum, the liaison sampled from the next stratum. If multiple detainees were available for a stratum, the liaison used a random number table and the last digit of the CCJTDC ID number to randomly sample potential participants from within the stratum. The final sampling fractions for the stratum ranged from 0.018 to 0.689.

The thirteenth follow-up was conducted approximately 16 years after the baseline with a random subsample. Of those, 389 participants were given the Juvenile Justice Experiences and Weapons-Related Injury modules.

Longitudinal: Panel: Continuous

Male and female juvenile detainees, ages 10 to 18 at intake between 1995 and 1998.

Individual

The Main dataset includes administrative information on what measures were conducted, the location of and type of interview, interview date, and age of respondent at interview. This dataset (da37255-0001) has 20 variables, 1,829 observations.

The Juvenile Justice Experiences and Weapons-Related Injury dataset includes the data collected from both supplemental interview modules. The Juvenile Justice Experience data includes information about juvenile court experiences, family support, juvenile detention and prison facilities and services, perceived fairness in rules and treatment by staff, security and victimization, and gang activity. The Weapons-Related Injury data includes information on gun violence and knife violence victimization. This dataset (da37255-0002) has 241 variables, and 1,829 observations

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2019-06-27

2019-06-27 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed consistency checks.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.
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Sampling weights are augmented with adjustments for nonresponse (e.g. withdrew, died) at the follow-up. Sampling weights and normalized sampling weights are provided in the main dataset da37255-0001.

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Notes

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