Charleston Heart Study, Charleston, South Carolina, 1960-2000 (ICPSR 4050)

Version Date: Jun 3, 2021 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Paul J. Nietert, Medical University of South Carolina-Charleston; Susan E. Sutherland, Medical University of South Carolina-Charleston; David L. Bachman, Medical University of South Carolina-Charleston; Julian E. Keil, Medical University of South Carolina-Charleston; Peter Gazes, Medical University of South Carolina-Charleston; Edwin Boyle, Medical University of South Carolina-Charleston

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04050.v4

Version V4 ()

  • V4 [2021-06-03]
  • V3 [2010-06-07] unpublished

The Charleston Heart Study (CHS) represents data collected over a 41-year period (1960-2000) in order to provide an understanding of the natural progression of aging in a community-based cohort. In 1960 the CHS began enrolling a random selection of community residents who were 35 years of age and older -- including men and women, Black and White. The primary hypothesis of the original study was to investigate racial differences in the manifestation and risk factors for coronary disease. Over the ensuing 40+ years, a variety of outcome measurements were incorporated into the re-examination of the participants, including psychosocial, behavioral, aging, and functional measures. As a longitudinal study, the CHS allows for the study of the risk factors, correlates, and consequences of aging, while simultaneously allowing for exploration of racial disparity in the manifestation of putative risk factors and outcomes. The CHS began with baseline data and added a special cohort of Black men. In subsequent years three separate follow-ups were conducted. The data include death information for respondents and background characteristics (age, race, sex, occupation, education, and marital status).

Nietert, Paul J., Sutherland, Susan E., Bachman, David L., Keil, Julian E., Gazes, Peter, and Boyle, Edwin. Charleston Heart Study, Charleston, South Carolina, 1960-2000. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2021-06-03. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04050.v4

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United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Aging (AG021162-01)

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This collection is restricted-use. Users interested in obtaining these data from NACDA must complete the NAS-NRC Restricted Data Use Agreement form. Users can download this form from the download page associated with this dataset. Completed forms with original signature(s) should be emailed to icpsr-nacda@umich.edu.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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1960 -- 2000
1960 -- 1961 (Baseline), 1963 -- 1964 (Phase 3 Additional Cohort), 1984 -- 1985 (Phase 10), 1987-04-01 -- 1990-03-30 (Phase 11), 1990-04-01 -- 1991-03-31 (Phase 12), 1960 -- 2000 (Deaths)
  1. The documentation for this collection is available for direct download; the data files are restricted-use and users must complete the data use agreement to access the data.

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To provide an understanding of the natural progression of aging in a community-based cohort. The primary hypothesis of the original study was to investigate racial differences (Black and White) in the manifestation and risk factors for coronary disease. As a longitudinal study, the CHS allows for the study of the risk factors, correlates, and consequences of aging, while allowing for exploration of racial disparity in the manifestation of putative risk factors and outcomes.

The study was completed during the course of 6 phases, with each phase containing a unique study design:

  • Baseline: The baseline data are derived from both a personal interview and a brief physical examination with each participant.

  • Phase 3 (Additional Cohort): A special cohort of 102 Black men were recruited to fill a void of higher socioeconomic status Black men that resulted from the initial cohort selection in 1960-61. 125 Black men were nominated for inclusion by their peers and resulted in 102 observations. The data are derived from both a personal interview and a brief physical examination with each participant.

  • Phase 10 (Recall 3): Returning subjects participated in an in-home interview with one of two trained interviewers. Those participants who were unable to be interviewed in person were contacted by telephone or mail. A separate questionnaire was developed for the purpose of self-completion, and is not included in the documentation. For the listed interview, the order of the variables generally follows the questionnaire. The user is cautioned to consider the many skip patterns used in administering the questionnaire.

  • Phase 11 (Recall 4): Returning subjects participated in part or all of a follow-up study. Parameters included background information; general health information; smoking history; functional disability; a cardiovascular questionnaire; sexual dysfunction; cognitive disability; Raynaud's phenomenon; medication history; serum sample; urinalysis; Holter monitoring; electrocardiograph; cardiovascular history; and physical examination

  • Phase 12 (Recall 5): Returning subjects participated in part or all of a follow-up study. Parameters included serum sample; urinalysis; blood pressure; hearing and visual screening; cognitive disability; walking test; medical history; physical exam; and questionnaires covering background information, general health, smoking history, functional disability, physical ability, cardiovascular health, sexual dysfunction, depression, coffee consumption, medication history, and nutrition

  • Deaths: data sources included the National Death Index and death certificates. Birthdates were obtained from several sources including follow-up surveys, death certificates, and internet resources. Study participants not confirmed deceased have a date of last contact provided.

Clustered geographical probability sample.

Longitudinal: Panel: Interval

Residents of Charleston County, South Carolina in 1960.

Individual

  • DS1: Baseline Data 2,181 cases, 48 variables

  • DS2: Phase 3 Additional Cohort Data 102 cases, 38 variables

  • DS3: Phase 10 (Recall 3) Data 1,040 cases, 253 variables

  • DS4: Phase 11 (Recall 4) Data 1,022 cases, 531 variables

  • DS5: Phase 12 (Recall 5) Data 917 cases, 570 variables

  • DS6: Deaths 2,283 cases, 13 variables

  • Physical Disability Index
  • Health Scale for the Aged
  • Wechsler Memory Scale
  • Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ)
  • Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale
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    2005-01-28

    2021-06-03 Materials underwent additional curation to produce data available in all statistical packages.

    2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
    • Nietert, Paul J., Susan E. Sutherland, David L. Bachman, Julian E. Keil, Peter Gazes, and Edwin Boyle. Charleston Heart Study, Charleston, South Carolina, 1960-2000. ICPSR04050-v4. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2021-06-03. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04050.v4

    2010-06-07 The data are restricted, but the documentation files are now available for download.

    2008-04-01 Minor edits were made to the metadata. A change was made in the Limited Use Agreement form and the codebook reflects this change.

    2005-01-28 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

    • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.
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    Notes

    • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

    • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.