Language Development of Non-verbal Children Age 3 Years through 7 Years, 2007 to 2012 [Kansas City Metro Area] (ICPSR 36472)

Version Date: Oct 25, 2016 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Nancy Brady, University of Kansas

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36472.v1

Version V1

The Language Development of Non-verbal Children Age 3 Years through 7 Years in the Kansas Metro Area is one of the three projects in the Communication of People with MR, 2006 to 2012 Series, which focuses on identifying participant variables that predict success in increasing communication skills of individual with intellectual disabilities. Data for Dataset 1 of this study were collected to illustrate how acquisition of symbolic communication using Voice Output Communication Aid (VOCA) affects the development of successful communication exchanges. For the data collection of Dataset 1, children were recruited by contacting school districts in and near the Kansas City metropolitan area, specifically, in Topeka, Kansas, and Wichita, Kansas. Teachers and speech-language pathologists were asked to nominate any children meeting specific criteria. The 93 children who were enrolled were administered the Mullen Scales of Early Learning and the Preschool Language Scale. A structured play assessment was also administered.

Subsequently, data for Dataset 2 was collected to analyze and compare 19 Spanish-speaking children to the original sample. Both data files contain the results of Complexity of Communication Scale, a measure developed by the Communication of People with MR project.

Brady, Nancy. Language Development of Non-verbal Children Age 3 Years through 7 Years, 2007 to 2012 [Kansas City Metro Area]. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-10-25. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36472.v1

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United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (5P01HD018955-25)

Users of the data must agree to the Terms of Use presented on the ADDEP Web site and available through the link in each codebook.

Public- and restricted-use versions of the data are included in this collection. For the public-use version of the data, certain identifying information in the downloadable version have been masked or edited to protect respondent privacy. For more information about the differences between the public- and the restricted-use versions of the data collection, please refer to the Codebook Notes section of the PDF Codebook. Users interested in obtaining the restricted-use version of the collection will need to complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement before they can obtain these data. Users can apply online for access to these data through the ICPSR restricted data contract portal. Please go to the "apply online for access to the data" link above to begin.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
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2007 -- 2012
2007-12-14 -- 2012-07-27
  1. Respondents in the public-use version have been de-identified by ICPSR staff. For details on the confidentiality measures taken to de-identify respondents, please see the codebook notes at the beginning of the codebook. To obtain the original demographic information data users may request access to the restricted-use data.

  2. This study is one of the three projects in the Communication of People with MR, 2006 to 2012 Series. The other two studies in this series are:

    • Requests for Assistance with Adaptive Switches from Individuals with Severe Communication Impairments, 2007 to 2012 [California, Kansas, and Washington] (ICPSR 36515)
    • Young Children with Physical Disabilities, 2007 to 2012 [Seattle, Washington] (ICPSR 36516)
  3. This study used the scales listed below. Please use the following references to assist in understanding these data.

    • Communication Complexity Scale:

      Brady, N., Fleming, K., Thiemann-Bourque, K., Olswang, L., Dowden, P., Saunders, M., and Marquis, J. (2012). Development of the Communication Complexity Scale. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 21(1), 16-28.

      Link to source: https://lsidata.ku.edu/ccs/index.php

    • Design to Learn:

      Rowland, C. and Schweigert, M. (2003). Design to Learn Inventory. Portland, OR: OHSU Design to Learn Projects Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale. Reference: Harms, T., Clifford, R., Cryer, D. (2005). Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale, Teachers College Press.
    • Mullen Scales of Early Learning:

      Mullen, E. (1995). Mullen scales of early learning: AGS edition. Circle Pines, MN: AGS.
    • Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test:

      Dunn, L., and Dunn, D. (2007). The Peabody Picture vocabulary Test-Fourth Edition (PPVT-4). San Antonio, TX: Psychological Corporation.
    • Preschool Language Scale:

      Zimmerman, I. L., Steiner, V., and Evatt Pond, R. (2003). Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition. San Antonio: The Psychological Corporation.
    • Social Communication Questionnaire:

      Rutter, M., Bailey, A., Berument, S. K., Lecouteur, A., and Lord, C. (2003). Social Communication Questionnaire. Los Angeles, CA: Western Psychological Services.
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For Dataset 1, ninety-three preschool children with intellectual disabilities were assessed at Time 1, and 82 of these children were assessed 1 year later, at Time 2. The outcome variable was the number of different words the children produced (with speech, sign, or speech-generating devices). Children's intrinsic predictor for language was modeled as a latent variable consisting of cognitive development, comprehension, play, and nonverbal communication complexity. Adult input at school and home, and amount of augmentative or alternative communication instruction, were proposed mediators of vocabulary acquisition.

Once children were recruited and informed consent had been obtained, the research staff contacted the parents and school staff to schedule the following three assessments, which were completed at home: the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, the Preschool Language Scale and a structured play assessment. During the home visit, research staff also collected demographic and background history information.

Select preschool-age children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including children with autism and Downs Syndrome were identified as candidates for augmentative and alternative communication.

For Dataset 1, children were recruited by contacting school districts in and near the Kansas City metropolitan area, specifically, in Topeka, Kansas, and Wichita, Kansas. Teachers and speech-language pathologists were asked to nominate any children meeting the criteria outlined below. Once the children had been nominated, their parents were contacted to gain informed consent and complete the screening and assessment process. At intake, each participant met the following eight criteria, verified through either teacher report or direct observation: (a) chronological age between 3 and 5 years; (b) enrollment in a preschool program; (c) vision reported as 20/80 or better in at least one eye (with or without correction); (d) hearing reported as 25 dB HL or better in at least one ear (with or without amplification); (e) upper body motor skills sufficient to directly select symbols with fingers, hands, or arms; (f) English as the primary language spoken at home; (g) current teaching plans that included AAC (graphic symbols, sign language, and/or an SGD); and (h) vocabularies of fewer than 20 different words said, signed, or selected. For this last criterion, parents and teachers were asked to list words produced spontaneously (without prompting), intentionally (directed to another person), and intelligibly. If there were inconsistent reports between teachers and parents for individual children, the researchers moved forward with the first visits and planned to screen the child on the basis of further discussions and observations of the child at school and home. Any children whom were observed by the researchers to produce more than 20 different words during the initial observations at school and home were not included in the study.

Longitudinal

individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities with minimal communication skills

individual

  • Communication Complexity Scale
  • Design to Learn
  • Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale
  • Mullen Scales of Early Learning
  • Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test
  • Preschool Language Scale

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2016-10-25

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Brady, Nancy. Language Development of Non-verbal Children Age 3 Years through 7 Years, 2007 to 2012 [Kansas City Metro Area]. ICPSR36472-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-10-25. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36472.v1

2016-10-25 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.
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Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.