Family Connections Across Generations and Nations: Jamaica, Guyana, and the United States

Instructor(s):

There are two key aims of this workshop. The first is to increase awareness of the rich complex national surveys of Black Americans and Caribbean persons from Jamaica and Guyana collected by scholars affiliated with the Program for Research on Black Americans, the Institute for Social Research, the University of Michigan. The second aim it is to provide scholars with opportunities to construct their own measures of family connections and intergenerational linkages, expectations of intra-familial and intergenerational relations, and formal and informal service needs and utilization patterns.

By conducting exploratory data analysis, scholars will have a brief glimpse of the interrelatedness of key measurement constructs across the data sets. It will also allow participating scholars to critically assess the cross-national validity of core constructs and possible ways to utilize existing variables in each dataset to enhance conceptual and measurement validity. This will provide workshop participants with ideas for how to use existing datasets to examine research questions even when the same questions are not presented during the data collections. Prior published work utilizing measures of family connections and intergenerational linkages, expectations of intra-familial and intergenerational relations, and formal and informal service needs and utilization patterns will be used to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using specific questions for operationalizing the constructs of focus. Considerable time will be devoted to constructing reliable and valid measures of these constructs from the three datasets around which the workshop revolves. Participants will be afforded time to explore how race or ethnicity influence the relative influence that family connections and intergenerational linkages, expectations of intra-familial and intergenerational relations, and formal and informal service needs and utilization patterns have on the health and well-being of African American, US-based Black Caribbean, Jamaican, and Guyanese respondents.

Data on US Black Caribbean, non-Hispanic White, and African American respondents are drawn from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL). Matched samples were also surveyed in Jamaica and Guyana. In addition, attendees will explore, to a limited degree, the influence that acculturation may have in fostering a strong sense of family connections among these different groups of respondents.

Finally, guest lecturers will enhance workshop participants' knowledge of the scholarly contribution of particular national surveys.

Application: Admission to this course is through a competitive application process. Enrollment is limited to 25 participants. Applications must include a vita and a cover letter summarizing research interests, course objectives, quantitative/statistical background, and experience, as well as a completed on-line enrollment through the Program registration site. All supporting materials must be submitted electronically through the Summer Program registration Portal on each applicant's Summer Program account page.

Deadline: Applications are due by Thursday, May 30, 2013.

Fee: There will be no workshop fees for accepted participants.

Tags: Jamaica, Guyana, Caribbean

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