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Geographies of Urban Crime in Nashville, Tennessee, Portland, Oregon, and Tucson, Arizona, 1998-2002 (ICPSR 4547)

Published: Aug 31, 2006

Principal Investigator(s):
Meagan Elizabeth Cahill, University of Arizona

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04547.v1

Version V1

This research involved the exploration of how the geographies of different crimes intersect with the geographies of social, economic, and demographic characteristics in Nashville, Tennessee, Portland, Oregon, and Tucson, Arizona. Violent crime data were collected from all three cities for the years 1998 through 2002. The data were geo-coded and then aggregated to block groups and census tracts. The data include variables on 28 different crimes, numerous demographic variables taken from the 2000 Census, and several land use variables.

Cahill, Meagan Elizabeth. Geographies of Urban Crime in Nashville, Tennessee, Portland, Oregon, and Tucson, Arizona, 1998-2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-08-31. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04547.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2003-IJ-CX-1007)

latitude and longitude

1998 -- 2002

1998 -- 2002

The files are provided in a WinZip archive with 43 files in three folders. The Geographical Data folder provides provides the Nashville, Portland, and Tucson data in geographic files for use with mapping software. The Statistical Data folder provides the Nashville, Portland, and Tucson data in SPSS for Windows 14.0 system files. The Report Files folder contains the final report and a data dictionary for use with the SPSS for Windows 14.0 system files.

The purpose of the study was to explore how the geographies of different crimes intersect with the geographies of social, economic, and demographic characteristics in urban places and to develop an understanding of the implications of specific contexts of crime and the spatial relationships between those contexts.

This research examined violent crime data collected from the Metro Nashville Police Department, the Portland Police Bureau, and the Tucson and South Tucson Police Departments for the years 1998 through 2002. The location and date of each crime was collected, and the data were geo-coded and aggregated to block groups and census tracts. Frequencies of crime for each category were averaged over the five years in the study period to control for anomalous years when there may have been an unexplained spike or fall in crime. Rates were then calculated using the population figures taken from 2000 Census data. Land use data for each city were obtained from the Metro Nashville government, the Portland Metro government, and the Pima County (AZ) Department of Transportation.

Data are included for 445 block groups and 143 census tracts in Nashville, 457 block groups and 160 census tracts in Portland, and 427 block groups and 126 census tracts in Tucson

All crimes committed in Nashville, Tennessee, Portland, Oregon, and Tucson, Arizona, between 1998 and 2002.

census block group

The crime data were collected from the records of the Metro Nashville Police Department, the Portland Police Bureau, and the Tucson and South Tucson Police Departments. Demographic information for Nashville, Portland, and Tucson were collected from 2000 Census data. Land use data for each city were collected from the Metro Nashville government, the Portland Metro government, and the Pima County Department of Transportation.

census/enumeration data, aggregate data, and administrative data

These data contain 28 crime variables including: homicide, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, motor vehicle theft, other assaults, stolen property, criminal damage, weapons, commercialized sex, sex offenses, narcotic drug laws, offenses against family and children, driving under the influence (DUI), liquor law, disorderly, and juvenile violations. Several demographic variables are included, such as median family income, percent of families with one parent and children under 18, percent of the population over 25 with a college degree, percent of the population living below the poverty level, percent of population unemployed, percent of the population who are African American, percent of the population who are Latino, percent of the population under age 18, and percent of households with five or more members. The data also include land use variables such as the percent of land in commercial uses, the percent of land in high intensity multifamily housing, and the percent of land in multiple land uses.

Not applicable

none

2006-08-31

2006-08-31

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

NACJD logo

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.