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Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1997: Four Waves Combined (ICPSR 4037)

Published: Nov 4, 2005

Principal Investigator(s):
M. Kent Jennings, University of California-Santa Barbara; Gregory B. Markus, University of Michigan; Richard G. Niemi, University of Rochester; Laura Stoker, University of California-Berkeley

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04037.v1

Version V1

The Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study is a series of surveys designed to assess political continuity and change across time for biologically-related generations and to gauge the impact of life-stage events and historical trends on the behaviors and attitudes of respondents. A national sample of high school seniors and their parents was first surveyed in 1965. Subsequent surveys of the same individuals were conducted in 1973, 1982, and 1997. This data collection combines all four waves of youth data for the study. The general objective of the data collection was to study the dynamics of political attitudes and behaviors by obtaining data on the same individuals as they aged from approximately 18 years of age in 1965 to 50 years of age in 1997. Especially when combined with other elements of the study as released in other ICPSR collections in the Youth Studies Series, this data collection facilitates the analysis of generational, life cycle, and historical effects and political influences on relationships within the family. This data collection also has several distinctive properties. First, it is a longitudinal study of a particular cohort, a national sample from the graduating high school class of 1965. Second, it captures the respondents at key points in their life stages -- at ages 18, 26, 35, and 50. Third, the dataset contains many replicated measures over time as well as some measures unique to each data point. Fourth, there is detailed information about the respondents' life histories. Background variables include age, sex, religious orientation, level of religious participation, marital status, ethnicity, educational status and background, place of residence, family income, and employment status.

Jennings, M. Kent, Markus, Gregory B., Niemi, Richard G., and Stoker, Laura. Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1997: Four Waves Combined. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-11-04. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04037.v1

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Danforth Foundation

National Science Foundation (SBR-9601295 (1997))

United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Aging

To protect the respondent privacy, the data file that contains ZIP code variables is restricted from general dissemination. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete an Agreement for the Use of Confidential Data, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research. Apply for access to these data through the ICPSR Restricted Data Contract Portal, which can be accessed via the study home page.

1965 -- 1997

1965 -- 1997 (Spring and early summer)

The 1965, 1973, 1982 and 1997 waves of the data collection were released by ICPSR under the titles STUDENT-PARENT SOCIALIZATION STUDY, 1965 (ICPSR 7286), YOUTH-PARENT SOCIALIZATION PANEL STUDY, 1965-1973 (ICPSR 7779), YOUTH-PARENT SOCIALIZATION PANEL STUDY, 1965-1982: WAVE III (ICPSR 9134), and YOUTH-PARENT SOCIALIZATION PANEL STUDY, 1965-1997: YOUTH WAVE IV, 1997 (ICPSR 4023). The Youth Studies Series also includes the following studies: HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS COHORT STUDY, 1965 AND 1973 (ICPSR 7575), YOUTH-PARENT SOCIALIZATION PANEL STUDY, 1965-1982: THREE WAVES COMBINED (ICPSR 9553), NATIONAL SURVEY OF THIRD GENERATION MEMBERS OF THE YOUTH-PARENT POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION STUDY, 1997 (ICPSR 3926), STUDY OF POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION: PARENT-CHILD PAIRS BASED ON SURVEY OF YOUTH PANEL AND THEIR OFFSPRING, 1997 (ICPSR 4024).

This dataset combines all four waves of the study. Data were collected by 100 percent face-to-face interviews for 1965, 83 percent face-to-face interviews and 17 percent self-administered questionnaires (SAQs) for 1973, 85 percent face-to-face interviews and 15 percent SAQs for 1982, and 50.5 percent computer assisted face-to-face interviews, 48.6 percent computer assisted telephone interviews, and 0.9 percent SAQs for 1997. SAQs were used in those instances when the respondents were out of reasonable reach for personal interviews. The SAQ instruments were an abbreviated version of the personal interview instruments.

The original data collection was based on a national probability sample of 1,669 high school seniors in 1965 distributed across 97 public and nonpublic schools selected with probability proportionate to size. The data collections for Wave II, Wave III, and Wave IV were designed to resurvey all respondents from each previous wave. No interim tracking was used between waves.

All high school seniors in the United States in 1965.

individual

event/transaction data

survey data

face-to-face interview

computer-assisted personal interview

computer-assisted telephone interview

self-enumerated questionnaire

The initial response rate of students within the school was 99 percent in 1965. Response rates for Waves II, III, and IV were 81 percent, 84 percent, and 82 percent, respectively. The 935 respondents who composed the four-wave respondents in this dataset represent 56 percent of the original respondents from the first wave. All response rates given here are unadjusted. The denominator includes the deceased, the incapacitated, and those not located or accessible, as well as the refusals. The major source of attrition in each wave was inability to locate the panel member.

2005-11-04

2005-11-04

2005-11-04 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

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