Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), 1990 (ICPSR 9749)

Version Date: Aug 2, 2012 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09749.v3

Version V3

Sample Survey of Law Enforcement Agencies

This survey, the second in the Bureau of Justice Statistics' program on Law Enforcement and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), presents information on four types of general-purpose law enforcement agencies: state police, local police, special police, and sheriff's departments. Variables include size of the population served by the police or sheriff's department, levels of employment and spending, various functions of the department, average salary levels for uniformed officers, and other matters related to management and personnel.

United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), 1990. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2012-08-02. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09749.v3

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics
Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1990
1990-07 -- 1991-01

The data map is provided as an ASCII text file, and the codebook is provided by ICPSR as a Portable Document Format (PDF) file.

All primary general-purpose state police agencies were chosen. All sheriff's departments, local police departments, and special agencies with more than 100 sworn officers were chosen. A stratified random sampling method was used in selecting smaller agencies.

All state, local, special, and sheriff's law enforcement agencies in the United States.

self-enumerated questionnaires

survey data

1993-04-03

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • United States Department of Justice. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), 1990. ICPSR09749-v3. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2012-08-02. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR09749.v3

2012-08-02 Short and long form surveys have been added to the codebook.

2008-12-05 This study has been updated to reflect full current Hermes product suite, Part 2, which was the SAS data definition statements, has been rolled into Part 1, and the codebook has been rewritten.

2007-08-03 Codebook corrections have been made.

2004-03-22 Machine-readable documentation converted to PDF.

1993-04-03 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed consistency checks.
  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. Please see version history for more details.
NACJD logo

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.