Recidivism Among Young Parolees: a Study of Inmates Released from Prison in 22 States, 1978 (ICPSR 8673)

Published: May 30, 1997 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08673.v2

Version V2

This study examines the criminal activities of a group of young offenders after their release from prison to parole supervision. Previous studies have examined recidivism using arrests as the principal measure, whereas this study examines a variety of factors, including length of incarceration, age, sex, race, prior arrest record, prosecutions, length of time between parole and rearrest, parolees not prosecuted for new offenses but having their parole revoked, rearrests in states other than the paroling states, and the nature and location of rearrest charges. Parolees in the 22 states covered in this study account for 50 percent of all state prisoners paroled in the United States in 1978.

United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Recidivism Among Young Parolees: a Study of Inmates Released from Prison in 22 States, 1978. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1997-05-30. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08673.v2

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote
United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics

For certain variables, the data have been masked to maintain the respondent confidentiality.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1978
1985-01-04

This data collection is hierarchically structured with two levels. The first level contains Uniform Parole Report data and has 4,002 records with one record per case. The second level contains record of arrest and prosecution and has 22,192 records with one record per case.

Random selection, or stratified sampling, or all persons paroled, depending on the state, selected to ensure maximum coverage.

Population of offenders aged 18 to 22, released from prison to parole supervision.

Individual records supplied in the Uniform Parole Reports (UPR) and Federal Bureau of Investigation Records of Arrest and Prosecution (RAP)

event/transaction data

1988-01-06

1997-05-30

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Bureau of Justice Statistics. Recidivism Among Young Parolees: a Study of Inmates Released from Prison in 22 States, 1978. ICPSR08673-v2. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1997. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08673.v2

1997-05-30 SAS and SPSS data definition statements are now available for this collection.

1988-01-06 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. Please see version history for more details.
NACJD logo

This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.