Outcome Evaluation of Parents Anonymous, United States, 2003-2004 (ICPSR 37126)

Version Date: Nov 19, 2018 View help for published

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National Center on Crime and Delinquency

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37126.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

'Parents Anonymous' is a self-help group aimed at strengthening families and reducing child maltreatment outcomes. This study assessed whether parent's participation in the program was associated with child maltreatment outcomes and with their change in risk and protective factors. The study contains both qualitative and quantitative data.

For the quantitative segment, group facilitators completed a survey at the beginning of the study. Through these surveys facilitators provided information regarding their level of education, how they heard about their positions, whether they were paid workers or volunteers, and more. Following the completion of facilitator surveys, 206 parents new to the 'Parents Anonymous' program were interviewed. The first interview took place 1 month into the program and the third 6 months later. Parents were asked about their demographics, their living situations, parenting style, and stressors in their lives.

In the qualitative segment 36 parents from two states participating in the Spanish-language 'Parents Anonymous' groups were assessed with semi-structured in-person and over the phone interviews. The interviews were conducted once at the beginning of the program, 1 month into the program, and again at 6 months. Additional qualitative data was collected through group observations and focus groups.

National Center on Crime and Delinquency. Outcome Evaluation of Parents Anonymous, United States, 2003-2004. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-11-19. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37126.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (2000-JP-FX-K003), United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (2005-JK-FX-K064)

state

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2003-08 -- 2004-01
2003-08 -- 2004-01

The purpose of this study was to assess whether parent participation in the Parents Anonymous program was associated with child maltreatment outcomes and their change in risk and protective factors.

This was a two-tiered study with both quantitative and qualitative data analysis.

For the quantitative section group facilitators were given a survey to complete regarding their: education, nature of their position, whether or not they are paid or volunteers. In this questionnaire no information was collected regarding the Parents Anonymous program. Facilitators would then disperse a group assessment survey to gather information on variables including: leadership, mutual support, and demographics. The survey was provided in both English and Spanish and was designed to measure factors related to theoretical philosophy of Parents Anonymous. The survey was given one month into the program and again at 6 months. Maton's Mutual Support Scale was used to evaluate responses.

For the qualitative portion of the study, three individual phone interviews were conducted. The first interview happened at the very beginning of the program followed by a 1 month phone interview and finally an interview 6 months into the program.

A two-tiered sampling strategy was used: group level and individual level. The Parents Anonymous, Inc. national office provided contact information for all active groups across the country. Eligible group members were contacted via the group facilitator and asked to complete the assessment. Groups whose group facilitators and members agreed to participate were assessed with the group assessment questionnaire at two points.

Longitudinal

Parents involved in the Parents Anonymous program

Individuals
observational data, survey data

This study contains 3 data files. The first file contains 8 variables and 59 cases. Some of the variables in this file include: Group facilitator level of education, source of funding for facilitator position, how facilitators heard about Parents Anonymous.

The second file contains 158 variables and 583 cases. Some of the variables in this file include: Do you feel supported by the group?, How do you contribute to the group?, How many times have you been to these meetings?, How many children do you have?, How old are they?, what is your race?

The third file has 2212 variables and 206 cases. Some examples of variables within the file are: How many children do you have?, Who do your children live with?, employment status?, How much income do you bring to the household?, Have you ever struggled with addiction?, Do you ever struggle with mental illness?, If so how do you cope?.

Several Likert-type scales were used, and a variety of named scales related to parenting, life stress, conflict, quality of life, social support, alcohol and drug use, non-violent discipline tactics, and family assessment.

2018-11-19

2018-11-19 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.