An In-depth Examination of Batterer Intervention and Alternative Treatment Approaches for Domestic Violence Offenders, Utah, 2015-2018 (ICPSR 37123)

Version Date: Feb 28, 2019 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Linda Mills, New York University; Briana Barocas, New York University

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37123.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

This National Institute of Justice (NIJ)-funded study was designed to provide an in-depth examination of a batterer intervention program (BIP) and an alternative treatment approach using restorative justice (RJ) for domestic violence (DV) offenders. The study design provided an in-depth content analysis to complement a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded randomized controlled trial (RCT) in Salt Lake City, Utah that used an intention to treat method of analysis to determine which treatment program has the lowest arrest outcomes: a traditional BIP or a BIP plus RJ approach called Circles of Peace (CP). Utah requires a minimum of 16 weeks of treatment for domestic violence offenders mandated to treatment. BIP, a 16-week group-based treatment approach for offenders only, is largely didactic and focuses on changing sexist attitudes for the purpose of altering the behavior of offenders. BIP plus CP provides 12 weeks of offender-only group sessions (with RJ principles infused throughout), encouraging offenders to focus on behavioral and attitudinal change. Following the initial 12 group sessions, offenders participated in four weeks of individual circles with a willing victim or a victim advocate (if the victim does not want to participate), family members or other support people, and trained community volunteers.

The collection contains 2 SPSS data files: Case-Record-Review---BIP--CP-n-68-.sav (n=68, 313 variables) and Case-Record-Review---BIP-Only-n-92-.sav (n=92, 398 variables).

Data related to respondents' qualitative interviews are not available as part of this collection.

Mills, Linda, and Barocas, Briana. An In-depth Examination of Batterer Intervention and Alternative Treatment Approaches for Domestic Violence Offenders, Utah, 2015-2018. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2019-02-28. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR37123.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2011-WG-BX-0002)

None

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reason for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2015-05-04 -- 2018-07-10
2015-07-09 -- 2018-07-10

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

Data related to respondents' qualitative interviews are not available as part of this collection.

The purpose of this study was to provide an in-depth examination of a batterer intervention program (BIP) and an alternative treatment approach using restorative justice (RJ) for domestic violence (DV) offenders. The National Science Foundation (NSF) study is a two-part study; this National Institute of Justice (NIJ) study builds on Part II. Part I of the NSF study compared BIP only and BIP plus Circles of Peace (CP) for all DV cases (intimate partner and family violence). Part II of the NSF study and the NIJ study focused on intimate partner violence cases only. Interviews with offenders and victims over multiple points in time, video-recordings of treatment sessions, and a case record review allowed the researchers to test emerging theories that BIP plus CP may be a viable alternative to treatment, while ensuring that safety concerns are addressed when using this approach.

This National Institute of Justice (NIJ) study involved primary data collection (interviews with offenders and victims, video recording of treatment sessions, and a case record review). Using high definition (HD) video recording allowed the research team to capture the complexity of social interaction and behavior in treatment sessions that would not be otherwise observable with audio recording; it also allowed the team to attend to different information over time and to assess model fidelity.

Gathering in-depth data, including interviews and video recordings, on the process of the two treatment options allowed for a better understanding of how each of the approaches contribute to a reduction of violence and a more nuanced understanding of whether conjoint approaches are actually safe - probing the data for subtle forms of coercion during the treatment sessions but also seeking data on how these approaches may actually facilitate improvements in sexist attitudes and behaviors, insight into destructive patterns of relating, etc., significantly enhancing the quantitative findings.

During Part II of the National Science Foundation (NSF) study and the NIJ study, it was estimated that 224 male and female offenders (ranging in age, race, and ethnicity) would be randomly assigned to one of two treatments (approximately 112 to each treatment). The actual total was 274. There were separate groups for male and female offenders. Initial and ongoing assessments from the case records were analyzed quantitatively and were used to describe demographic and clinical characteristics of the sample.

OFFENDERS

Either immediately before or immediately after the usual intake assessment, offenders were informed by the treatment provider that there was a study about intimate partner treatment programs and that a member of the research team would like to speak with them to tell them about the study. If a member of the research team was unable to be there in person, the treatment provider informed the offender that there is a study about intimate partner violence treatment programs, and if they would like to learn more about it they could watch a short video about the study. Offenders were told that speaking to the member of the research team or viewing the video or participating in the study would have no effect on their treatment.

VICTIMS

Victim contact information for interviews was obtained from the treatment provider if a victim expressed interest in participating in the study. As required by statute, the treatment provider contacted victims (by phone) and informed them that their offender is in treatment and inquired about their safety. The treatment provider informed the victim that there was a study about intimate partner violence treatment programs for offenders that involved interviews that they could participate in. The treatment provider asked if they could pass along the victim's contact information to the research team. The treatment provider also sent recruitment flyers to victims with contact information for a member of the research team. If the victim was interested in participating in an interview, s/he could contact the research team member.

TREATMENT PROVIDERS

Members of the research team met with the domestic violence treatment providers at the local provider they were partnered with for the study to explain the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) study and invite their participation in the video recordings of the treatment sessions.

COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS AND VICTIM ADVOCATES

Members of the research team were involved with training and screening community volunteers and victim advocates to participate in the Circles of Peace (CP). Following the training of the volunteers and advocates, they were asked by the researchers if they would like to learn about a research study in which they could participate.

Cross-sectional

Domestic violence (Intimate partner violence only) offenders who were sentenced to treatment for a misdemeanor domestic violence crime from the Salt Lake City Justice Court or West Valley Justice Court (starting on April 15, 2015) and their victims.

Individual
administrative records data

The collection contains 2 SPSS data files: Case-Record-Review---BIP--CP-n-68-.sav (n=68, 313 variables) and Case-Record-Review---BIP-Only-n-92-.sav (n=92, 398 variables). These datasets contain variables on demographics and variables that indicate which topics were covered in interviews.

Not available

None

2019-02-28

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.