Effects of a Middle School Social-Emotional Learning Program on Bullying, Teen Dating Violence, Sexual Violence, and Substance Use in High School, Illinois, 2010-2016 (ICPSR 36726)

Version Date: Sep 17, 2018 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Dorothy L. (Dorothy Lynn) Espelage, University of Florida; Kristen L. Bub, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36726.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The purpose of this was to leverage an existing randomized controlled trial of The Second Step anti-bullying program, which was implemented when the sample of students was in middle school, by measuring related aggressive behaviors (e.g. bullying, cyberbullying, sexual violence) during the high school years. The objectives of this study were to determine treatment effects of the Second Step middle school program on reductions in youth aggression (including bullying), sexual violence, substance use, and teen dating violence when in high school, as well as to assess middle school belonging as a mediator of these treatment effects on targeted problem behaviors in high school.

Demographic variables included as part of this collection are students' age, gender, race, and household characteristics. The collection contains 3 SPSS data files:

  • analysis4_de-identified_2.sav (n=2143; 304 variables)

  • RCT-WAVE-1-4-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav (n=4718; 741 variables)

  • RCT---WAVE-5-7-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav (n=3064; 887 variables)

Espelage, Dorothy L. (Dorothy Lynn), and Bub, Kristen L. Effects of a Middle School Social-Emotional Learning Program on Bullying, Teen Dating Violence, Sexual Violence, and Substance Use in High School, Illinois, 2010-2016. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-09-17. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36726.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (#2013-VA-CX-0008)

None

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reason for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2010 -- 2013 (RCT-WAVE-1-4-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav), 2014 -- 2016 (RCT---WAVE-5-7-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav), 2010 -- 2015 (analysis4_de-identified_2.sav)
2010 -- 2013 (RCT-WAVE-1-4-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav), 2014 -- 2016 (RCT---WAVE-5-7-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav), 2010 -- 2015 (analysis4_de-identified_2.sav)

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The purpose of this was to leverage an existing randomized controlled trial of The Second Step anti-bullying program, which was implemented when the sample of students was in middle school, by measuring related aggressive behaviors (e.g. bullying, cyberbullying, sexual violence) during the high school years. The objectives of this study were to determine treatment effects of the Second Step middle school program on reductions in youth aggression (including bullying), sexual violence, substance use, and teen dating violence when in high school, as well as to assess middle school belonging as a mediator of these treatment effects on targeted problem behaviors in high school.

Participants consisted of 1565 students from 15 middle schools within the state of Illinois who were followed into six high schools. School districts were contacted by the principal investigators to introduce the project and to identify schools that would be interested in participating. Schools had to agree to random assignment and not to implement other school-wide bully prevention programming for the duration of the study.

Parents received information about the study through several outlets, including electronic newsletters, presentations to parent-teacher associations, email blasts from school administration, and family information nights. Information letters were sent to all parents of sixth graders in the participating districts. Parents could opt their child out of the study by calling the school or the researcher, or returning the signed parent form. Non-consented youth did not complete the survey and were removed from the room during the administration. Students provided assent to participate by signing the front page of the survey.

Teams of trained researchers administered the survey. There was a total of seven waves of data (4 middle school, 3 high school) to determine whether students who were part of the intervention group in a randomized control trial of Second Step in middle school demonstrated reductions in targeted problem behaviors in high school.

Participants consisted of 1565 students from 15 middle schools within the state of Illinois who were followed into six high schools. School districts were contacted by the principal investigators to introduce the project and to identify schools that would be interested in participating. Schools had to agree to random assignment and not to implement other school-wide bully prevention programming for the duration of the study. Males accounted for 52% of the sample; 22% identified as white, 31% as African-American, 33% as Hispanic, and 11% as Biracial etc. Mean age of students was 11 years of age at wave 1.

Longitudinal: Cohort / Event-based

Students from 15 middle schools in Illinois who were followed into 6 high schools.

Individuals, Schools
survey data

There are 3 data files included in this study.

RCT-WAVE-1-4-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav:

This data file contains data from waves 1 through 4 of the study. The data includes variables on student demographics; feelings of school belonging; bullying behaviors and experiences; experiences with and beliefs on sexual harassment, homophobia, empathy, and dating; delinquent behavior; and alcohol and drug use.

RCT---WAVE-5-7-ITEMS_RECODED_de-identified_2.sav:

This data file contains data from waves 5 through 7 of the study. The data includes variables on student demographics; feelings of school belonging; bullying behaviors and experiences; experiences with and beliefs on sexual harassment, homophobia, empathy, and dating; delinquent behavior; and alcohol and drug use.

analysis4_de-identified_2.sav:

This data file contains data from all waves of the study. The data includes variables on student demographics and calculated scores from the study's waves used in analysis.

86% participation rate

Several Likert-type scales were used.

2018-09-17

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.