Official Crime Rates of Participants in Trials of the Nurse-Family Partnership, Denver, Elmira, New York, and Memphis, 1977-2005 (ICPSR 36580)

Version Date: Dec 19, 2018 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
David L. Olds, University of Colorado at Denver

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36580.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

This study examined maternal and youth self-reports of arrests and convictions with official records of crime among participants in three randomized controlled trials of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) in Denver, Colorado, Elmira, New York, and Memphis, Tennessee.

Official records were obtained from third-party sources as well as directly from New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services.

The collection contains 10 SAS data files:

  • dmom_all.sas7bdat (n=735; 3 variables)
  • dmom_control.sas7bdat (n=247; 26 variables)
  • echild_all.sas7bdat (n=374; 6 variables)
  • echild_control.sas7bdat (n=173; 23 variables)
  • emom_all.sas7bdat (n=399; 6 variables)
  • file4-emom_control.sas7bdat (n=184; 18 variables)
  • mchild_all.sas7bdat (n=708; 5 variables)
  • file3-mchild_control.sas7bdat (n=482; 46 variables)
  • mmom_all.sas7bdat (n=742; 5 variables)
  • mmom_control.sas7bdat (n=514; 25 variables)

Demographic variables include race, ethnicity, highest grade completed, household income, marital status, housing density, maternal age, maternal education, husband/boyfriend education, and head of household employment status.

Olds, David L. Official Crime Rates of Participants in Trials of the Nurse-Family Partnership, Denver, Elmira, New York, and Memphis, 1977-2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-12-19. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36580.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (NIJ-201203084)

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Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reason for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1994 -- 1995 (Denver Intervention Phase), 2000 -- 2001 (Denver Child's Sixth Birthday Follow-Up), 1977 -- 1980 (Elmira Nurse Visitation Program), 1992 -- 1995 (Elmira Fifteen-Year Follow-Up), 1996 -- 1999 (Elmira Nineteen-Year Follow-Up), 1988 (Memphis Phase), 2005 (Memphis - Most Recent Survey)
1994-03-29 -- 1995-06-15 (Denver Intervention Phase), 2000 -- 2001 (Denver Child's Sixth Birthday Follow-Up), 1977 -- 1980 (Elmira Nurse Visitation Program), 1992 -- 1995 (Elmira Fifteen-Year Follow-Up), 1996 -- 1999 (Elmira Nineteen-Year Follow-Up), 1988 (Memphis Phase), 2005 (Memphis - Most Recent Survey)

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The study's purpose was to ascertain sentencing outcomes for finger-printable crimes among mothers and their first-born children. It used randomized controlled trials of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of prenatal and infant/toddler home visiting for low income mothers bearing first children, that has been identified as an effective crime-prevention intervention. The NFP is a program of prenatal and infant/toddler home visiting for low income mothers bearing first children that has been identified as an effective crime-prevention intervention, based upon self-reported arrests and convictions among mothers and their children enrolled in the Elmira trial. It was believed that criminal records, if abstracted completely, have the potential to afford a more comprehensive picture of offending.

The researchers originally intended to employ data from the National Crime Information Center's (NCIC) Inter-state Identification Index (III) to ascertain official arrests, convictions, and sentencing outcomes for finger-printable crimes among mothers and their first-born children. However, the FBI would not release these data so a commercial firm, Direct Screening (DS), was used to carry out criminal record abstractions.

Because DS had incomplete access to criminal justice records, criminal records were obtained directly from the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services. These data were also found incomplete in criminal-justice measures so analyses were conducted using a simple yes-no for criminal-history outcomes.

In the Elmira trial, the latest surveys conducted with mothers were completed 15 years after birth of the first child, and with children, 27 years after birth of the first child. In the Memphis trial, the most recent survey for mothers and children was completed when the firstborn child was 19 years of age. Surveys of maternal arrests were not conducted in the Denver trial and the children in Denver were too young to have arrest records. Reviews of criminal records were completed in September, 2014, when the youngest child in the Elmira trial was 33, the youngest in Memphis was 22, and the youngest in Denver was 18.

Samples were selected from primarily low income first-time pregnant mothers living in the following cities and years:

  • Elmira, New York: 1978-1980
  • Memphis, Tennessee: 1990-1992
  • Denver, Colorado: 1994-1996

Time Series

  • Denver, CO: Pregnant women from 21 antepartum clinics serving low-income women in the Denver metropolitan area, whom have had no previous live births and either qualified for Medicaid or had no private insurance. Exclusion criteria included families with fetal/child deaths, maternal deaths, adoptions/terminations of parental rights, and study withdrawals.
  • Elmira, NY: Young men and women (27-year-olds) who have participated in a randomized controlled trial of prenatal and infancy home visiting by nurses in Elmira, New York since their mothers registered in the trial during their pregnancies between 1977 and 1980. Mothers that registered were enrolled in the study before the 30th week of pregnancy, 85 percent of whom were either low-income, unmarried, or teenaged. Exclusion criteria included individuals who declined at earlier phases of follow-up, who exhibited severe cognitive impairment, and those whom were adopted.
  • Memphis, TN: Pregnant women (ages 25-46) from an obstetrical clinic in Memphis, Tennessee, whom were less than 29 weeks pregnant, had no previous live births, no specific chronic illnesses thought to contribute to fetal growth retardation or preterm delivery, and had 2 of 3 of the following sociodemographic risks: (1) unmarried, (2) less than 12 years of education, and (3) unemployed; The mothers' firstborn children (around age 17) who have participated in a randomized trial of prenatal and infancy home visiting by nurses in Memphis, Tennessee since 1988, and subsequent children born to the mothers prior to the first child's fifth birthday, were also included.

Individuals
administrative records data, observational data, survey data

dmom_all.sas7bdat (n=735; 3 variables): the analysis dataset for Denver mothers containing assignment and arrest outcomes. Variables include: ID, treatment group, and arrest/conviction history.

dmom_control.sas7bdat (n=247; 26 variables): the analysis dataset for the Denver mother sample that is restricted to the control group. Variables include: ID, maternal age, housing density, drug usage, and race.

echild_all.sas7bdat (n=374; 6 variables): the analysis dataset for Elmira children containing assignment and arrest outcomes. Variables include: Identification and arrest information.

echild_control.sas7bdat (n=173; 23 variables): the analysis dataset for Elmira children sample restricted to the control group. Variables include: Identification, drug and alcohol usage, child abuse and neglect, and support from grandmother.

emom_all.sas7bdat (n=399; 6 variables): the analysis dataset for Elmira mothers containing assignment and arrest outcomes. Variables include: Identification and arrest information.

file4-emom_control.sas7bdat (n=184; 18 variables): the analysis dataset for Elmira mothers sample restricted to the control group. Variables include: Identification, marital status, age, education, number of months employed, number of months receiving food stamps, and arrest information.

mchild_all.sas7bdat (n=708; 5 variables): the analysis dataset for Memphis children containing assignment and arrest outcomes. Variables include: Identification and arrest information.

file3-mchild_control.sas7bdat (n=482; 46 variables): the analysis dataset for Memphis children sample restricted to the control group. Variables include: Study identification number, cigarettes and alcohol usage, highest grade completed, gambling behavior, conflict with parents, and whether respondent was ever a gang member.

mmom_all.sas7bdat (n=742; 5 variables): the analysis dataset for Memphis mothers containing assignment and arrest outcomes. Variables include: Identification and arrest information.

mmom_control.sas7bdat (n=514; 25 variables): the analysis dataset for Memphis mothers sample restricted to the control group. Variables include: study identification, race, head of household employment status, alcohol and drug usage, substance abuse, conflict with parents, household poverty index, anxiety, depression, and arrest/conviction history.

Demographic variables include race, highest grade completed, household income, marital status, housing density, maternal age, maternal education, maternal race, husband/boyfriend education, and head of household employment status.

Greater than 95 percent of those originally randomized

  • Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (KABC)
  • Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-III (PPVT)
  • Peabody Individual Achievement Test-R-Norm-Updated (PIAT R-NU)
  • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WAIS)
  • Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Leiter-R)
  • Youth Self Report (YSR)
  • Child Behavior Checklist
  • Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI)-Substance Abuse Module (CIDI-SAM)
  • Facial Recognition Task
  • Straus Conflict Tactics Scales
  • Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT-2)

2018-12-19

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.