Examining the Effects of the TASER on Cognitive Functioning, Arizona, 2012-2013 (ICPSR 36150)

Published: Dec 20, 2017

Principal Investigator(s):
Michael D. White, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety, Arizona State University; Justin T, Ready, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Arizona State University; Robert J. Kane, Program in Criminal Justice, Drexel University

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36150.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

These data were collected as part of an effort to investigate the effects of the TASER on cognitive functioning. To explore this issue, the authors carried out a pilot study with 21 police recruits who received a TASER exposure as part of their training at the San Bernardino County (CA) Training Center. Following the pilot study, the researchers conducted a Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) where healthy human volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups, two of which received a TASER exposure. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests before and after receiving their assigned treatment.

White, Michael D., Ready, Justin T, and Kane, Robert J. Examining the Effects of the TASER on Cognitive Functioning, Arizona, 2012-2013. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-12-20. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36150.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2011-IJ-CX-0102)

None

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

2012 -- 2013

2012-04-24 -- 2013-04-30

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether TASER exposure produces deficits in cognitive functioning, and if so, to characterize the duration and severity of those effects.

The researchers in the current study investigated the effects of the TASER on cognitive functioning using a two phase approach. First, the researchers carried out a pilot study that examined the effects of the TASER on cognitive functioning among a sample of police recruits who were scheduled to be "tased" as part of their academy training. Each of the recruits was asked to complete a series of cognitive tests at three points in time: three to four hours prior to the TASER exposure; immediately after the TASER exposure; and again 24 hours later. Second the researchers carried out a Randomized Control Test (RCT) where healthy human volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four research conditions: 1) Baseline, no physical exertion and no TASER exposure; 2) Treatment 1, physical exertion only; 3) Treatment 2, TASER exposure only; 4) Treatment 3, physical exertion and TASER exposure. Each participant completed a series of validated cognitive tests that measure levels of memory, concentration, speed of learning, auditory comprehension and motor skills. The tests were completed by each participant at five points in time before and after the assigned treatment conditions.

No sampling was involved. This study used an experimental design on police recruits who were going to be tasered as part of their instruction and volunteers who did not have medical conditions that would introduce confounding effects.

Cross-sectional

Pilot Study: Officers of the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department undergoing mandatory TASER training.

Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT): Healthy individuals between 18-65 years old who read and understand the English language.

Individuals

experimental data

The collection includes two SPSS datasets.

  • Data file Pilot Study Data File.sav (n=21)contains 104 variables collected in the Pilot Study. Almost all variables are the results on the cognitive tests measuring memory, concentration, speed of learning, auditory comprehension and motor skills, pre and post TASER exposure.
  • Data file RCT Data File.sav (n=203) contains 449 variables collected in the Randomized Control Trial. The bulk of variables are the results of cognitive tests with dates of testing. Variables describe which treatment group the person was assigned to and whether all testing completed. No demographic variables are included.

Not applicable.

This study used standardized cognitive functioning tests including:

  • Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT)
  • Digit Span Subtest
  • Digit Symbol Subtest
  • Trail Making Test A and B
  • Halstead Finger Tapping Test

2017-12-20

2017-12-20

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.