School Health Center Healthy Adolescent Relationship Program (SHARP) Integrating Prevention and Intervention in Northern California School Health Centers, 2012-2013 (ICPSR 35612)

Published: Dec 20, 2017

Principal Investigator(s):
Alison Chopel, California Adolescent Health Collaborative, Public Health Institute; Elizabeth Miller, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center; Sandi Goldstein, California Adolescent Health Collaborative, Public Health Institute (retired)

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35612.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The School Health Center Healthy Adolescent Relationship Program (SHARP) was a school health center (SHC) provider-delivered multi-level intervention to reduce adolescent relationship abuse (ARA) among adolescents ages 14-19 seeking care in SHCs. This study tested the effectiveness of a brief relationship abuse education and counseling intervention in SHCs.

The SHARP intervention consisted of three levels of integrated intervention:

  1. A brief clinical intervention on healthy and unhealthy relationships for SHC (cisgender and transgender) male and female patients delivered by SHC providers during all clinic visits (evaluated via client pre- and post-surveys and chart review)
  2. Development of an ARA-informed SHC staff and clinic environment (evaluated via provider pre and post-training surveys and interviews)
  3. SHC-based youth-led outreach activities within the school to promote healthy relationships and improve student safety (evaluated by focus groups with youth leaders and measures of school climate)

The collection consists of:

3 SAS data files

  1. sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat (n=1,011; 272 variables)
  2. sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat (n=1,949; 259 variables)
  3. sharp_chart_data_archive_icpsr.sas7bdat (n=936; 24 variables)
2 Stata data files
  1. SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta (n=38; 21 variables)
  2. SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta (n=66; 102 variables)

5 SAS syntax files

  1. NIJ SHARP - Analyses.sas
  2. NIJ SHARP - DataMgmt_Final.sas
  3. NIJ SHARP - Formats.sas
  4. SHARP - Chart Extraction Data-MASKED.sas
  5. SHARP - Chart Extraction Formats.sas

3 Stata syntax files

  1. code-for-SHARP-dating-violence-analyses-deidentified-MASKED.do
  2. SHARP_Provider Data to Archive-MASKED.do
  3. SHARP-analyses-deidentified-MASKED.do

3 PI provided codebooks

  1. SHARP Codebook_Client Chart Data.xlsx (1 worksheet)
  2. SHARP Codebook_Client Survey Data.xlsx (3 worksheets)
  3. SHARP Codebook_Provider Survey Data.xlsx (1 worksheet)

For confidentiality reasons, qualitative data from focus groups are not currently available. Focus groups were conducted with each student outreach team following the conclusion of data collection. Discussions focused on awareness about ARA, the school-wide campaign, using the SHC as a resource, and what else can be done to prevent ARA in schools.

Chopel, Alison, Miller, Elizabeth, and Goldstein, Sandi. School Health Center Healthy Adolescent Relationship Program (SHARP) Integrating Prevention and Intervention in Northern California School Health Centers, 2012-2013. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-12-20. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35612.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2011-MU-MU-0023)

None

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reason for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research. Restricted Data Access Terms NACJD

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

2012 -- 2013

2012 -- 2013

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

For confidentiality reasons, qualitative data from focus groups are not currently available.

This cluster randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a brief relationship abuse education and counseling intervention in school health centers.

Data files sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat and sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat: These components were conducted via baseline survey, post-clinic visit exit survey, and follow-up survey three months post-intervention. Participants were recruited from all 8 school health centers (SHCs) from September to December 2012. All follow-up surveys were completed by June 2013.

Baseline assessment: Once assent for the patient survey was secured, study staff set up a laptop computer with the audio computer assisted survey (ACASI) to complete the baseline assessment. It took 15 minutes to complete this assessment on average. Following completion of the survey, patients received SHC services.

Procedures for intervention: The individual-level intervention for patients, described above, was conducted as an integrated component during the patient's visit with health care providers at intervention SHCs. Providers reported that on average, it took a minute or less to complete with most patients, but went longer with patients who disclosed adolescent relationship abuse (ARA).

Post-visit assessment: Immediately following their clinic visit, all participants completed an exit survey. The purpose of the survey was to assess whether or not patients received the intervention. These measures were used to ensure fidelity to the intervention and to perform intensity-adjusted analyses. It took approximately two minutes for patients to complete this survey.

Follow-up assessment: Participants were contacted for the follow-up assessment 3 months after their baseline assessment using patient-provided contact information. Participants were reminded that their participation was voluntary and offered three methods of completing the assessment: 1) same setting as baseline, using ACASI on a laptop in a private room; 2) telephone survey with study staff; and 3) online survey. For those completing the assessment via telephone or the internet, the study staff verified that the participants had a safe and private place in which to answer the survey. Safety protocols were established and communicated to participants (e.g., if interrupted during the phone call, a participant could use a pre-established safety word or simply hang up).

Data file sharp_chart_data_archive_icpsr.sas7bdat: Chart extraction was conducted with medical records for those participants gave permission for reviewing their medical record and who had signed a HIPPA authorization form.

Data file SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta: Surveys with providers in the intervention SHCs were conducted prior to their training and six months after the training.

Data file SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta: Healthcare provider and staff responses to pre-training, and 4-5 month post-training surveys are included in this data file.

Focus groups: Focus groups were conducted with each student outreach team following the conclusion of data collection. Discussions focused on awareness about ARA, the school-wide campaign, using the SHC as a resource, and what else can be done to prevent ARA in schools. The focus group discussions were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded iteratively by two members of the investigative team. Codes focused on youth descriptions of student outreach team activities, peer impressions of the ARA prevention activities, and acceptability of the SHARP intervention. The data from these focus groups are not available as part of this collection.

For data files sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat and sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat, eleven school health centers (SHCs) in Northern California already part of the California School-Based Health Alliance were recruited to participate in this study. Several of the SHC schools were participating in the federal Safe and Supportive Schools (S3) project, which involved school climate interventions to reduce bullying and violence, which was accounted for in the randomization via stratification. Two of the clinics shared providers, thus were treated as a single cluster. Cluster randomization was selected as the intervention was available to all patients served by a clinic. Ten clinic clusters were evenly randomized into intervention and control arms by using computer-generated randomization. After randomization and before participant enrollment, 3 schools withdrew when new school administrators determined they did not want the SHC participating in research, leaving 8 SHCs (7 clusters: 4 intervention, 3 control) as the final sample.

For data file sharp_chart_data_archive_icpsr.sas7bdat, chart extraction was conducted with medical records for those participants gave permission for reviewing their medical record and who had signed a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) authorization form.

For data files SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta and SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta, all SHC staff participation in the trial was voluntary. As a condition of participation, all clinics completed a Memorandum of Understanding that clearly stated willingness of the SHC director and staff to participate in the study, and that participating providers would complete an on-line certified educational training on human subjects research. At the intervention sites, participation in the study's intervention training was strongly encouraged but attendance was not a condition of employment at the SHC. Health care providers and staff were told the pre- and post-training surveys were voluntary. At the control sites, providers were told that they may voluntarily receive the study's intervention training after the data collection phase was complete.

Longitudinal

For data files sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat, sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat, and sharp_chart_data_archive_icpsr.sas7bdat: Adolescents age 14-19 in northern California in 2012-2013

For data files SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta and SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta: School health centers in northern California in 2012-2013

For data files sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat, sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat, and sharp_chart_data_archive_icpsr.sas7bdat: Individual

For data files SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta and SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta: Clinic

School climate data for this study came from staff-reported California School Climate Survey (CSCS) and student-level California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS) using the Fall 2011-12 (pre-SHARP timepoint) and Fall 2013-14 wave (post-SHARP) data.

clinical data

survey data

Data files sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat (n=1,011; 272 variables) and sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat (n=1,949; 259 variables) contain nearly the same variables. These include questions related to demographics, general self efficacy (how the respondents thought of themselves), recognition of abusive behavior, recognition of sexual or reproductive coercion, and healthy relationships (what was important to the respondents u in a person they were going out with or dating). Respondents were also asked about intentions (what the respondents might do in certain situations), sexual intercourse history, violence victimization, cyber or tech abuse, non-partner violence victimization, and knowledge and use of available services. Additionally there were questions regarding birth control, pregnancy, pregnancy prevention, self efficacy health, reproductive coercion harm reduction self-efficacy, and reproductive coercion harm reduction action. Lastly, respondents answered questions about their clinic visit, disclosure of adolescent relationship abuse (ARA), their provider talk, and their attitudes towards their health care providers and the clinic. The date file sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat contains additional variables which collapse other variables or create scores.

Data file sharp_chart_data_archive_icpsr.sas7bdat (n=936; 24 variables) includes date of visit, documentation that safety brochure given, documentation of reproductive coercion assessment, documentation of adolescent relationship abuse assessment, disclosure of adolescent relationship abuse, and if positive disclosure, provider documentation of what they did for the patient.

The data file SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta (n=38; 21 variables) contains variables related to the respondents' views of how the training increased understanding in certain areas and what actions related to ARA the respondents might take following the training.

The data file SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta (n=66; 102 variables) contains variables regarding professional development, professional role, actions related to ARA, and reasons for not addressing ARA. There are also questions related to clinic preparedness for ARA, ongoing support, clinic participation in education, and demographic information. Respondents also answered questions related to post-training ARA confidence, actions related to ARA post-training, and post-training communication.

Ninety-five percent of eligible clients participated in the study.

Several Likert-type scales were used in data files sharp_abuse_data_archive.sas7bdat, sharp_blt2exit_long_data_archive.sas7bdat, SHARP_Provider Immediate Post_0829 and 0905 training_final-ICPSR.dta, and SHARP_Provider Pre and Followup_final.dta-ICPSR.dta.

2017-12-20

2017-12-20

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.