Police Practitioner-Researcher Partnerships: Survey of Law Enforcement Executives, United States, 2010 (ICPSR 34977)

Published: Jan 9, 2018 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Geoffrey P. Alpert, University of South Carolina; Jeff Rojek, University of South Carolina

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34977.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they are received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompany readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of police practitioner-research partnerships in the United States and examine the factors that prevent or facilitate development and sustainability of these partnerships. This study used a mixed method approach to examine the relationship between law enforcement in the United States and researchers. A nationally-representative sample of law enforcement agencies were randomly selected and given a survey in order to capture the prevalence of police practitioner-researcher partnerships and associated information. Then, representatives from 89 separate partnerships were interviewed, which were identified through the national survey. The primary purpose of these interviews was to gain insight into the barriers and facilitators of police and practitioner relationships as well as the benefits of this partnering. Lastly four case studies were conducted on model partnerships that were identified during interviews with practitioners and researchers.

Alpert, Geoffrey P., and Rojek, Jeff. Police Practitioner-Researcher Partnerships: Survey of Law Enforcement Executives, United States, 2010. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-01-09. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34977.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2009-IJ-CX-0204)

United States

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2010
2010-03 -- 2010-07

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they are received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompany readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator if further information is needed.

The qualitative and multi-media data derived from case studies and from interviews with law enforcement practitioners and researchers are not available as part of this release.

The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of police practitioner-research partnerships in the United States and examine the factors that prevent or facilitate development and sustainability of these partnerships.

This study used a mixed method approach to examine the relationship between law enforcement in the United States and researchers. A nationally-representative sample of law enforcement agencies were randomly selected and given a stratified survey to capture the prevalence of police practitioner-researcher partnerships and associated information. Representatives from 89 separate partnerships were interviewed, which were identified through the national survey. The primary purpose of these interviews was to gain insight into the barriers and facilitators of police and practitioner relationships as well as the benefits of this partnering. Lastly four case studies were conducted on model partnerships that were identified during interviews with practitioners and researchers.

The sample was drawn using the 2009 National Directory of Law Enforcement Agencies (NDLEA) database, which contains information on 15,759 state and local law enforcement agencies. A stratified sampling strategy was employed to provide a nationally-representative sample of law enforcement agencies that used these three criteria from the NDLEA. Agency type categories were state police and highway patrol, municipal and county police departments, and independent city and county sheriff departments. The U.S. census categories were used to identify the four regions of agency location. Jurisdiction population was divided into the following categories:

  • Under 10,000
  • 10,000 to 49,999
  • 50,000 to 99,999
  • 100,000 to 499,999
  • 500,000 to 999,999
  • 1,000,000 or more
  • However, there were 921 agencies that did not have a jurisdiction population provided in the NDLEA. This group was classified into a seventh category of "missing population."

    The first step in the sampling process was an oversampling of state law enforcement agencies and large municipal and county agencies. This involved selecting all state police or highway patrol for each state (n=50) and all municipal and county agencies serving areas with 100,000 jurisdictional population or more (n=827). The remaining sample (n=1,141) was randomly selected from agencies with jurisdictional populations of less than 100,000, divided across the above population, region, and agency type categories. This randomly selected portion of the sample was intended to be equally distributed across the strata. However, some strata had no agencies or low counts, resulting in some strata having fewer agencies in the sample than others. As a result of this strata representation and an effort for equal representation, a total of 2,018 agencies were initially selected. After the initial survey was distributed, three agencies were identified as not providing law enforcement services, resulting in a final sample of 2,015.

    Longitudinal: Panel: Interval, Cross-sectional

    Law enforcement agencies included in the 2009 National Directory of Law Enforcement Agencies (NDLEA) database.

    Agency and Partnership
    survey data

    Dataset 'file3-GENERAL_SURVEY.sav' contains 871 cases with 57 variables covering topics such as: the nature of the partnerships, research benefits, community policing techniques, and use of technology.

    Dataset 'file4-INDIVIDUAL_PARTNERSHIPS.sav' contains 393 cases and 20 variables covering topics such as: research funding, research products, and success of the partnership.

    43%

    A likert-type scale was used.

    2018-01-09

    2018-01-09

    2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
    • Alpert, Geoffrey P., and Jeff Rojek. Police Practitioner-Researcher Partnerships: Survey of Law Enforcement Executives, United States, 2010. ICPSR34977-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-01-09. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34977.v1

    Notes

    • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

    • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

    • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

    • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
    NACJD logo

    This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.