Bullying, Sexual, and Dating Violence Trajectories From Early to Late Adolescence in the Midwestern United States, 2007-2013. (ICPSR 34835)

Published: Nov 14, 2016 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Dorothy Espelage, University of Illinois; Sabina Low, Arizona State University; Carolyn Anderson, University of Illinois

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34835.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they there received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except of the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompany readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collections and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

This study tested a model of individual, familial, and peer variables that additively and synergistically increased or decreased the risk for sexual and teen dating violence based on bullying experiences in early adolescence. The study surveyed 1,162 students from three cohorts in four Midwestern middle schools, who were then followed into three high schools. Five waves of surveys collected information about the level of violence in student homes with parents and siblings or with other children, physical abuse, sexual abuse, exposure to domestic violence, frequency of bullying, self-reported delinquency, and exposure to delinquent friends during the middle school years. Waves six and seven were collected during high school and sexual violence and teen dating violence measures were added to the surveys.

Espelage, Dorothy, Low, Sabina, and Anderson, Carolyn. Bullying, Sexual, and Dating Violence Trajectories From Early to Late Adolescence in the Midwestern United States, 2007-2013. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-11-14. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34835.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2011-MU-FX-0022)

None

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2007 -- 2013
2008 -- 2013

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The purpose of the study was to answer two main questions:

  1. What were the rates of bullying in middle school and rates of sexual harassment, dating violence perpetration and victimization in high school? How do these rates differ by gender?
  2. Does family violence, delinquency predict bullying during the middle school years and do these variables predict later bullying, sexual violence, and teen dating violence perpetration?

This study followed a social-ecological model and focused on understanding how individual characteristics of children interact with environmental contexts or systems to promote or prevent victimization and perpetration. Quantitative data were collected from students across middle school, waves one to five from 2007 to 2010, and into high school, wave six to seven from 2012 and 2013. Surveys conducted in waves one to five were designed to collect information about the level of violence in student homes with their parents and siblings or with other children, physical abuse, sexual abuse, exposure to domestic violence, frequency of bullying, self-reported delinquency, and exposure to delinquent friends during the middle school years. Waves six and seven were during high school years and sexual violence and teen dating violence measures were added to the survey.

To address concerns with missing data a multiple imputation procedure was used to ensure parameter estimates were unbiased and valid inferences from the statistical analysis could be made. Analysis of data with missing values involved three steps. In the first step, a series of complete data sets were created in which missing values were replaced by random draws from a distribution of plausible values. Thirty complete data sets were created because for waves one to four variables were assumed to be missing at random (MAR) and the values in wave five to seven were assumed missing completely at random (MCAR) due to the design of the study. In the second step, path models were fit to each of the 30 imputed data sets. In the final step, parameter estimates, standard errors, and fit statistics from each of the 30 analyses were aggregated according to Rubin's rules (1987).

1,162 students from four Midwestern middle schools, three cohorts from grades five to seven, who were followed into three high schools. Students completed one survey in each of seven waves of data collection; in Spring 2008 (Wave 1), Fall 2008 (Wave 2), Spring 2009 (Wave 3), Fall 2009 (Wave 4), Spring 2010 (Wave 5), Spring 2012 (Wave 6), and Spring 2013 (Wave 7).

Longitudinal

Fifth through seventh graders attending four middle schools in a school district in the Midwestern United States.

Individuals
survey data

Bullying, Sexual, and Dating Violence Trajectories From Early to Late Adolescence in the Midwestern United States, 2007-2013 (n=34860) contains 226 variables on; respondent's imputation number and subject number, age, gender, sexual orientation at time of survey wave, disability, grade at time of survey wave, school, household composition at time of survey wave, academic grades, and parent's education level. Respondents were also asked whether they were victimized by or perpetrated; sexual abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, bullying, domestic violence, sibling aggression, and substance abuse. Additionally, respondents were asked about: their exposure to domestic violence; delinquent acts by their friends; and their attitudes towards traditional masculinity, anger, bullying, need for control and dominance, and delinquency. For waves 6 and 7 respondents were asked about their dating history parental knowledge and permission on dating, attitudes towards dating violence, and sexual activity.

95 percent

Users should consult Bullying, Sexual, and Dating Violence Trajectories From Early to Late Adolescence (NCJ 246830 - https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=268920) for scales information.

2016-11-14

2016-11-14

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Espelage, Dorothy, Sabina Low, and Carolyn Anderson . Bullying, Sexual, and Dating Violence Trajectories From Early to Late Adolescence in the Midwestern United States, 2007-2013.. ICPSR34835-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-11-14. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34835.v1

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.