Consequences of Childhood Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence in Chicago, Illinois, 1994-2000 (ICPSR 20344)

Version Date: Apr 15, 2008 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Clifton R. Emery, University of Chicago

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20344.v1

Version V1

This study used data from the first two waves of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) to analyze the consequences of childhood exposure to intimate partner violence. The researcher for this study attempted to make four contributions: (1) provide theory driven research in the field of intimate partner violence, (2) do practical research, (3) strike a balance between the resolution of measurement problems and the examination of concrete outcomes, and (4) use high quality data and advanced statistical techniques to adjudicate between conflicting findings in existing literature. The nine data files used in this study were drawn from multiple imputed iterations using the Expectation-Maximization (E.M.) algorithm and data augmentation to address missing data. They included data from two waves of the PHDCN, with 4,955 records for each wave. The data included information for subjects aged 0 to 18 and covered the years 1994 to 2000. The researcher used various scales to measure domestic violence exposer, the impact of exposure on the child's cognitive functioning, the behavioral impact of exposure to domestic violence, anxiety, and the parent-child relationship. Data include the variables that the researcher used to study the effect of domestic violence exposure on not only externalizing, internalizing, and total behavior problems, and academic and cognitive ability, but also truancy, grade repetition, and drug use. This study also contains a selection of variables from several PHDCN studies including those pertaining to intimate partner violence, child abuse, juvenile delinquency, deviance of peers, alcohol use, primary caregiver involvement in the subject's life, and demographics.

Emery, Clifton R. Consequences of Childhood Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence in Chicago, Illinois, 1994-2000. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-04-15. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20344.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2005-WG-BX-0001)

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Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

1994 -- 2000
1994 -- 2000
(1) The PHDCN was a large-scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development. One component of the PHDCN was the Longitudinal Cohort Study, which was a series of coordinated longitudinal studies that followed over 6,000 randomly selected children, adolescents, and young adults, and their primary caregivers over time to examine the changing circumstances of their lives, as well as their personal characteristics, that might lead them toward or away from a variety of antisocial behaviors. Numerous measures were administered to respondents to gauge various aspects of human development, including individual differences, as well as family, peer, and school influences. For more information about the PHDCN, users are encouraged to read the study descriptions for the PHDCN studies utilized by the researcher, or users can access the information on the PHDCN Web site. (2) For a detailed explanation of the statistical processes used, please see the technical report in the documentation that accompanies these data files.

This study analyzed the consequences of childhood exposure to intimate partner violence. The researchers for this study attempted to make four contributions: (1) provide theory driven research in the field of intimate partner violence, (2) do practical research, (3) strike a balance between the resolution of measurement problems and the examination of concrete outcomes, and (4) use high quality data and advanced statistical techniques to adjudicate between conflicting findings in existing literature.

The PHDCN data were collected to be representative of neighborhoods in Chicago. The data from the PHDCN was chosen for this project because of this representative quality of the sample frame, the large sample size, and the longitudinal nature allowed the same child to be compared at different ages.

The nine data files used in this study were drawn from multiple imputed iterations using the Expectation-Maximization (E.M.) algorithm and data augmentation to address missing data. They included data from the first two waves of the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) with 4,955 records for each wave. The data included information for subjects aged 0 to 18 and covered the years 1994 to 2000.

The researcher used Straus and Gelles' Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) (see PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONFLICT TACTICS SCALE FOR PARTNER AND SPOUSE, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [ICPSR 13583]) for the child's mother and her partner to measure domestic violence exposure. The researcher measured child outcomes using several scales. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) (see PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): WECHSLER INTELLIGENCE SCALE FOR CHILDREN-REVISED, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [ICPSR 13604], and PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): WECHSLER INTELLIGENCE SCALE FOR CHILDREN-REVISED, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [ICPSR 13664]) and the child's grades were used to measure the impact of exposure on the child's cognitive functioning. Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) (see PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13582) and PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 [ICPSR 13611]) and questions about child truancy, grade repetition, and drug use were used to assess the behavioral impact of exposure to domestic violence. Anxiety was measured by the anxiety sub-scale of the CBCL. The parent-child relationship was measured by selected questions from the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) scale (see PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): HOME OBSERVATION FOR MEASUREMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 [ICPSR 13594]).

For this study, the researcher defined domestic violence as the use of physical force (for example, forcible restraint, slapping, shoving, throwing objects at, hitting, kicking, biting, burning, sexual assault, or murder) or threat of the same against an intimate partner (someone with whom the perpetrator was involved in a romantic or sexual relationship for at least a month). Additionally, exposure to domestic violence was defined as cohabitation with a primary caregiver who was a perpetrator or victim of domestic violence. The definition of childhood included aged 0 to 18.

Stratified probability sample.

Children, adolescents, young adults, and their primary caregivers, living in the city of Chicago in 1994-2000.

individual

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): WECHSLER INTELLIGENCE SCALE FOR CHILDREN-REVISED, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13604)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONFLICT TACTICS FOR PARENT AND CHILD, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13584)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): HOME AND LIFE INTERVIEW, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13630)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 2, 1997-2000 (ICPSR 13611)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): DEVIANCE OF PEERS, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13585)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SELF REPORT OF OFFENDING, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13601)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CHILD BEHAVIOR CHECKLIST, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13582)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SUBSTANCE USE, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13602)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): CONFLICT TACTICS SCALE FOR PARTNER AND SPOUSE, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13583)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): SCHOOL SCREEN, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13600)

PROJECT ON HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN CHICAGO NEIGHBORHOODS (PHDCN): MASTER FILE, WAVE 1, 1994-1997 (ICPSR 13580)

survey data

Data include the variables that the researcher used to study the effect of domestic violence exposure on not only externalizing, internalizing, and total behavior problems, and academic and cognitive ability, but also truancy, grade repetition, and drug use. This study also contains a selection of variables from several PHDCN studies including those pertaining to intimate partner violence, child abuse, juvenile delinquency, deviance of peers, alcohol use, primary caregiver involvement in the subject's life, and demographics.

Not applicable.

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist, Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment, Provisions of Social Relations, Deviance of Peers Scale, Conflict Tactics Scale, and Child Conflict Tactics Scale.

2008-04-15

2008-04-15

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Emery, Clifton R. CONSEQUENCES OF CHILDHOOD EXPOSURE TO INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 1994-2000. ICPSR20344-vl. Chicago, IL: Clifton R. Emery, University of Chicago [producer], 2006. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-04-15. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR20344.v1

2008-04-15 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.