Disorder and Community Decline in Forty Neighborhoods of the United States, 1977-1983 (ICPSR 8944)

Version Date: Apr 20, 1998 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Wesley G. Skogan

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08944.v2

Version V2

This data collection was designed to evaluate the effects of disorderly neighborhood conditions on community decline and residents' reactions toward crime. Data from five previously collected datasets were aggregated and merged to produce this collection: (1) REACTIONS TO CRIME PROJECT, 1977 [CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, SAN FRANCISCO]: SURVEY ON FEAR OF CRIME AND CITIZEN BEHAVIOR (ICPSR 8162), (2) CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH AND LOW CRIME NEIGHBORHOODS IN ATLANTA, 1980 (ICPSR 8951), (3) CRIME FACTORS AND NEIGHBORHOOD DECLINE IN CHICAGO, 1979 (ICPSR 7952), (4) REDUCING FEAR OF CRIME PROGRAM EVALUATION SURVEYS IN NEWARK AND HOUSTON, 1983-1984 (ICPSR 8496), and (5) a survey of citizen participation in crime prevention in six Chicago neighborhoods conducted by Rosenbaum, Lewis, and Grant. Neighborhood-level data cover topics such as disorder, crime, fear, residential satisfaction, and other key factors in community decline. Variables include disorder characteristics such as loitering, drugs, vandalism, noise, and gang activity, demographic characteristics such as race, age, and unemployment rate, and neighborhood crime problems such as burglary, robbery, assault, and rape. Information is also available on crime avoidance behaviors, fear of crime on an aggregated scale, neighborhood satisfaction on an aggregated scale, and cohesion and social interaction.

Skogan, Wesley G. Disorder and Community Decline in Forty Neighborhoods of the United States, 1977-1983. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1998-04-20. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08944.v2

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (85-IJ-CX-0074)
Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1977 -- 1983
1985

The 40 neighborhoods are a convenience sample based on the availability of surveys with similar variables of interest. Each of the five data collections from which the sample was drawn used different procedures for selecting respondents and different definitions of community. See detailed descriptions in Lewis and Skogan (ICPSR 8162), Greenberg (ICPSR 7951), Taub and Taylor (ICPSR 7952), Pate and Annan (ICPSR 8496), and Skogan's final report to the National Institute of Justice.

(1) REACTIONS TO CRIME PROJECT, 1977 [CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, SAN FRANCISCO]: SURVEY ON FEAR OF CRIME AND CITIZEN BEHAVIOR (ICPSR 8162), (2) CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGH AND LOW CRIME NEIGHBORHOODS IN ATLANTA, 1980 (ICPSR 8951), (3) CRIME FACTORS AND NEIGHBORHOOD DECLINE IN CHICAGO, 1979 (ICPSR 7952), (4) REDUCING FEAR OF CRIME PROGRAM EVALUATION SURVEYS IN NEWARK AND HOUSTON, 1983-1984 (ICPSR 8496), and (5) a survey of citizen participation in crime prevention in six Chicago neighborhoods conducted by Rosenbaum, Lewis, and Grant.

aggregate data

1989-01-10

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Skogan, Wesley G. Disorder and Community Decline in Forty Neighborhoods of the United States, 1977-1983. ICPSR08944-v2. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1998. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR08944.v2

1998-04-20 The data have been reformatted to logical record length, and new SPSS data definition statements have been prepared. Also, SAS data definition statements were produced for the collection, and the codebook was converted to a Portable Document Format file.

1989-01-10 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Standardized missing values.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. Please see version history for more details.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.