Americans' Use of Time, 1965-1966, and Time Use in Economic and Social Accounts, 1975-1976: Merged Data (ICPSR 7796)

Version Date: Feb 16, 1992 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Philip E. Converse; F. Thomas Juster

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07796.v1

Version V1

This data collection contains a single concatenated file that merges common variables for respondents from two separate surveys, including 1,241 respondents from AMERICAN'S USE OF TIME, 1965-1966 (ICPSR 7254), and 812 respondents from TIME USE IN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ACCOUNTS, 1975-1976 (ICPSR 7580), for a total of 2,053 respondents. The sample was restricted to match the design of the earlier study, so the merged file includes data for individual Americans between 19 and 65 years of age living in cities with a population between 30,000 and 280,000, and in households that had at least one adult employed in a non-farming occupation. Two general types of information were gathered in both studies: sociodemographic background characteristics and time use data for a 24-hour period. The 1965-1966 time use data were obtained from a diary of activities kept by the respondent over a 24-hour period, and the 1975-1976 data were collected in face-to-face interviews. In both cases, the sociodemographic data also were gathered from personal interviews. The merged file contains sociodemographic background data that includes age, sex, race, relationship to head of household, occupation, marital status, number and age of children in household, homeowner/renter status, residence tenure, number of paid household help, number of books owned, church/religious preferences, highest level of education attained, whether raised on a farm, and income level. The time use data in the merged file chronicles activities such as work outside the home, household/domestic work, child care, obtaining goods and services, personal care needs, education and professional training, organization involvement, entertainment/social activities, sports/active leisure, and passive leisure.

Converse, Philip E., and Juster, F. Thomas. Americans’ Use of Time, 1965-1966, and Time Use in Economic and Social Accounts, 1975-1976: Merged Data. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1992-02-16. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07796.v1

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Due to changes in coding and editing procedures from 1965 to 1975, some detail in time use activity codes was lost and activity codes could not be made exactly comparable in all cases.

In AMERICAN'S USE OF TIME, 1965-1966 (ICPSR 7254), a national cross-section sample was used, plus a group of approximately 776 respondents from Jackson, Michigan. In TIME USE IN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ACCOUNTS, 1975-1976 (ICPSR 7580), multistage area probability sampling was used. Respondents living in areas not comparable to the 1965 urban sampling areas were excluded when creating the merged data collection.

Adults between 19 and 65 years of age living in cities in the United States with a population between 30,000 and 280,000, and in households that had at least one adult employed in a non-farming occupation.

personal interviews and self-enumerated forms

survey data

1984-07-02

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Converse, Philip E., F. Thomas Juster. AMERICANS' USE OF TIME, 1965-1966, AND TIME USE IN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ACCOUNTS, 1975-1976: MERGED DATA. ICPSR07796-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Survey Research Center [producer], 1976. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1999. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07796.v1

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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