Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1973 (ICPSR 7779)

Published: Jan 28, 2016

Principal Investigator(s):
M. Kent Jennings; Richard G. Niemi

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07779.v3

Version V3

This study has two parts: a youth panel and a parent panel. High school students and their parents were interviewed in 1965 and reinterviewed in 1973. The panel study is designed to assess political continuity and change across time for two biologically-related generations and to explore life cycle, generational, and period effects. Analysis can be performed at the aggregate as well as the individual level. Because the two samples come from the same families, parent-offspring pairs can be formed (by matching I.D. numbers). At the core of the study are a number of standard political variables available at both time points. The 1973 wave includes a number of questions that capture the political and non-political histories of the respondent across the eight-year panel period. Also included in the 1973 data are a large number of variables dealing with perspectives on public policy issues. The 1965 youth wave schedule contains detailed questions about high school experiences, and both the youth and parental schedules treat familial relationships.

Jennings, M. Kent, and Niemi, Richard G. Youth-Parent Socialization Panel Study, 1965-1973. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-01-28. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07779.v3

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote

1965 -- 1973

High school students in the United States and their parents.

personal interviews

survey data

1984-03-18

2016-01-28

2016-01-28 The SPSS setup files were updated to conform to current standards.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

ICPSR logo

This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.