Detroit Area Study, 1962: Family Growth in Detroit (ICPSR 7401)

Published: Jun 16, 2011

Principal Investigator(s):
Ronald Freedman; David Goldberg


Version V4

The main focus of this data collection was women's attitudes toward family and family size. The women interviewed for this study answered questions on past pregnancies and described their attitudes toward large and small families, their reasons for having children, and the nature of their own patterns of family growth. Extensive family background information was also collected, including data on occupation of respondent and husband, age of respondent and husband, education of respondent and husband and their parents, family income, types of savings, and housing information.

More information about the Detroit Area Studies Project is available on this Web site.

Freedman, Ronald, and Goldberg, David. Detroit Area Study, 1962: Family Growth in Detroit. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2011-06-16.

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personal interviews

survey data



2011-06-16 SAS, SPSS, and Stata setups have been added to this data collection.

1984-05-10 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.


  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

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This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.