Career Values in Brazil, 1960 (ICPSR 7042)

Published: May 8, 2009

Principal Investigator(s):
Joseph Kahl

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07042.v2

Version V2

This is the first of two studies conducted by Kahl concerning career patterns and values in Latin American countries (see also CAREER VALUES IN MEXICO, 1963 [ICPSR 7058]). The present study was carried out in 1960 in the Brazilian states of Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, and Rio Grande do Sul. The study assessed the respondents' occupations at the time they were interviewed, the length of their employment, what they liked most and least about their jobs, and their incomes. Variables further explored past occupations, the highest level of education attained, and the extent to which lack of education had handicapped respondents' careers. A major portion of the study probed the respondents' feelings about the nature of jobs and people: the importance of ambition and determination in one's job, individual versus group interests, how best to "get ahead," importance of family ties, tendency to trust others, and corruption in the urban centers. A number of recodes and derived measures are included.

Kahl, Joseph. Career Values in Brazil, 1960. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-05-08. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR07042.v2

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1960

1960

inap.

Employees of private enterprises and government offices in Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, and Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil.

personal interviews

survey data

1984-05-10

2009-05-08

2009-05-08 SAS, SPSS, and Stata setups have been added to this data collection.

1984-05-10 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

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