Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT): Revised Fourth Edition, 1991 (ICPSR 6100)

Version Date: Jan 12, 2006 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
United States Department of Labor. United States Employment Service, and the North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06100.v1

Version V1

First published in 1939, the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) groups jobs based on their similarities and defines the structure and content of all listed occupations. The Revised Fourth Edition is the result of ten years of research and verification by job analysts across the nation. Each occupational definition systematically presents the following seven basic parts: an occupational code number, a title, an industry designation, alternate titles, a body of text including a lead statement, task statements, glossary words, and reference titles, undefined related titles, and a definition trailer. The occupational code number and the definition trailer provide data about a particular job's skill requirements, specific vocational training requirements, and year last reviewed by an occupation analyst.

United States Department of Labor. United States Employment Service, and the North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center. Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT):  Revised Fourth Edition, 1991. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2006-01-12. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06100.v1

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The North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center has asked users to read and abide by the following conditions of use for this data collection: (1) Users should use the dataset and any supplements, corrections, or additions within the context in which the data were collected. (2) Users should acknowledge that component ratings for Work Fields, MPSMS, Significant Worker Functions, Temperaments, Aptitudes, Environmental Conditions, and Physical Demands (except Strength) have been copyrighted by the North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center. (3) or the data source should be appropriately cited (see the acknowledgment page of the codebook). (4) Users are asked to provide the North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center with a printed copy and documentation of any and all data, access strategies, and databases used to supplement the DOT database.

On-site job analyses conducted in Michigan, Missouri, Massachusetts, and Utah, supervised by a lead field office in North Carolina, supplemented by information gathered from Occupational Code Request forms submitted by DOT users to local Occupational Analysis field offices

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1994-03-10

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • United States Department of Labor, United States Employment Service, and the North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center. DICTIONARY OF OCCUPATIONAL TITLES (DOT): REVISED FOURTH EDITION, 1991. Washington, DC: United States Department of Labor, United States Employment Service, and Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Occupational Analysis Field Center [producer], 1991. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1994. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR06100.v1

2006-01-12 All files were removed from dataset 31 and flagged as study-level files, so that they will accompany all downloads.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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