Perceptions of Symbols in Foreign Policy: Data from the Vietnam Case, 1964-1968 (ICPSR 5903)

Published: Feb 16, 1992

Principal Investigator(s):
Michael P. Sullivan

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR05903.v1

Version V1

This data collection contains a content analysis of 367 speeches made by United States President Lyndon Johnson that are about or contain references to Vietnam in the period 1964-1968. The dataset is divided into four sections. Variables in section one are coded for document number and date, document designation code such as press conference, television address, formal speech, White House statement, and congressional request, Vietnam designation and reference code, and audience designation code. Variables in section two are coded for symbolic words such as aggression, allies, anarchy, communism, democracy, freedom, national interest, peace, security, courage, and principles. Section three provides frequency counts of 34 countries, cities, geographical regions, and international organizations that were mentioned in President Johnson's speeches. Section four provides the frequency with which President Johnson used each of six pronouns referring either to himself or to a generalized public.

Sullivan, Michael P. Perceptions of Symbols in Foreign Policy:  Data from the Vietnam Case, 1964-1968. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 1992-02-16. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR05903.v1

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1964 -- 1968

A total of 367 speeches made by United States President Lyndon Johnson that are about or contain references to Vietnam in the period 1964-1968.

PAPERS OF THE PRESIDENT, 1964-1968

aggregate data

1984-05-03

1992-02-16

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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