Urban Growth in America: Philadelphia, 1774-1930 (ICPSR 56)

Published: Mar 25, 2008 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Sam Bass Warner

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR00056.v1

Version V1

This study contains aggregate economic, political, and social data for the city of Philadelphia in the period 1774-1930. Data are provided for occupational categories in 1774 and 1860 (Parts 1 and 3), the place of birth of the city inhabitants in 1860 (File 2), and for workers aged 10 and over in 1930, tabulated by ward and industry group (Part 4).

Warner, Sam Bass. Urban Growth in America: Philadelphia, 1774-1930. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-03-25. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR00056.v1

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1774 -- 1930

Users should consult Sam Bass Warner, Jr., THE PRIVATE CITY: PHILADELPHIA IN THREE PERIODS OF ITS GROWTH, for additional information about the data.

The city of Philadelphia in the period 1774-1930.

Philadelphia city directories and tax lists, and census returns for the years 1770-1780, 1830-1860, and 1920-1930

census/enumeration data, and aggregate data

1984-05-10

2008-03-25

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Warner, Sam Bass. Urban Growth in America: Philadelphia, 1774-1930. ICPSR00056-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2009-02-20. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR00056.v1

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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