ABC News/Washington Post Pre-Inaugural Monthly Poll, January 2005 (ICPSR 4313)

Published: Oct 26, 2005 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
ABC News; The Washington Post

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04313.v1

Version V1

This special topic poll, conducted January 12-16, 2005, was undertaken to assess public opinion prior to George W. Bush's second-term inauguration as President of the United States of America. Views were sought on President Bush and his handling of the presidency, as well as on issues such as the economy, foreign affairs, social security, taxes, health care, and education. Respondents were asked if they thought President Bush would do a better job as a president in his second term than in his first term, and whether the country should go in Bush's or the Democrats' in Congress leadership direction. Respondents were also asked what level of priority Bush and the Congress should give issues such as the United States campaign against terrorism, health care, and restricting medical malpractice and class-action lawsuits. Likewise, opinions were solicited on whether Bush would or would not make substantial progress in the next four years on, for example, the economy, the situation in Iraq, and the federal budget deficit. Respondents were asked if they were hopeful or fearful about how the Bush Administration may deal with specific issues, such as environmental policy, same-sex marriage, appointing judges to the United States Supreme Court, and social security. Questions about the war in Iraq asked respondents whether they believed it was worth fighting and if the war had contributed to the long-term security of the United States. Other questions concerned the elections in Iraq, social security, the cost of Bush's inauguration, whether companies should face big penalties in lawsuits, potential new laws regulating medical lawsuits and class-action lawsuits, the United States' handling of illegal immigrants, and what the single biggest environment problem is that the world faces. Background information on respondents includes political party affiliation, the strength of their political party affiliation, whether they voted in the November 2004 presidential election, for whom they voted -- George W. Bush (Republican), John Kerry (Democrat), Ralph Nader (Green Party), or Other -- in the November 2004 presidential election, political orientation, education, religion, Hispanic origin, ethnicity, income, and sex.

ABC News, and The Washington Post. ABC News/Washington Post Pre-Inaugural Monthly Poll, January 2005. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-10-26. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04313.v1

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2005-01
2005-01-12 -- 2005-01-16

Additional information about sampling, interviewing, and sampling error may be found in the codebook.

There are some undocumented codes in the Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) variable.

Households were selected by random-digit dialing. Within households, the respondent selected was the adult living in the household who last had a birthday and who was home at the time of the interview.

Persons aged 18 and over living in households with telephones in the contiguous 48 United States.

individual
survey data

2005-10-26

2005-10-26

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • ABC News, and The Washington Post. ABC News/Washington Post Pre-Inaugural Monthly Poll, January 2005. ICPSR04313-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-10-26. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04313.v1

The data contain weights that should be used for analysis.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

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