Problem Behaviors in Maltreated Children and Youth: Influential Child, Peer, and Caregiver Characteristics, 1999-2000 [United States] (ICPSR 4258)

Published: Jul 6, 2005 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Ariana E. Wall, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04258.v1

Version V1

This project examined the problem behaviors of maltreated children and adolescents and the predictors of changes in behavior over an 18-month period. Problem behaviors included aggression, delinquency, risky sexual practices, substance abuse, and suicidal behaviors. The project used data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), a national probability survey of children assessed following a child maltreatment report. This collection consists of SAS code used to produce subsets of the NSCAW data and the analyses for three chapters of the project's final report. Chapter 2 examined aggression and changes in behavior over 18 months for children aged six to ten years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 3 examined self-reported delinquency and caregiver-reported aggressive and delinquent behavior and changes in behavior over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 4 examined risky behavior changes (risky sexual behavior, substance abuse, and suicidal risk behavior) over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview.

Wall, Ariana E. Problem Behaviors in Maltreated Children and Youth:  Influential Child, Peer, and Caregiver Characteristics, 1999-2000 [United States]. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-06. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04258.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2003-IJ-CX-1004)
Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1999-09 -- 2000-12
1999-09 -- 2000-12 (September 1999 to December 2000)
In order to use the SAS code provided in this collection, users must first obtain the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) data. The NSCAW data are available by application from the National Data Archive on Child Abuse and Neglect at Cornell University. Users are also strongly encouraged to read the documentation for the NSCAW data and the final report for this study.

This project examined the problem behaviors of maltreated children and adolescents and the predictors of changes in behavior over an 18-month period. Problem behaviors included aggression, delinquency, risky sexual practices, substance abuse, and suicidal behaviors. The project used data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), a national probability survey of children assessed following a child maltreatment report. Hypotheses developed for the current research were: (1) Physically abused children are more aggressive than children who experience other types of maltreatment, (2) Child characteristics such as low academic achievement, low social skills, hyperactivity-impulsivity-attention (HIA) problems, and peer rejection are associated with higher aggression at baseline and less improvement in aggressive behavior over 18 months. (3) Caregiver characteristics such as caregiver monitoring, harsh discipline, domestic violence, arrest, substance abuse, and poverty are associated with higher aggression at baseline and less improvement in aggressive behavior over 18 months (4) Higher cumulative risk is associated with higher aggression at baseline and less improvement in aggression over 18 months. (5) Males are more aggressive than females. (6) Meaningful variation exists by gender for child and caregiver characteristics associated with aggressive behavior at baseline. (7) Factors associated with change in aggression over 18 months vary by gender.

Data used for this project are from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), the first national longitudinal probability study of child welfare to collect extensive data from children, caregivers, teachers, and child welfare workers. This collection consists of SAS code used to produce subsets of the NSCAW data and the analyses for three chapters of the project's final report. Chapter 2 examined aggression and changes in behavior over 18 months for children aged six to ten years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 3 examined self-reported delinquency and caregiver-reported aggressive and delinquent behavior and changes in behavior over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview. Chapter 4 examined risky behavior changes (risky sexual behavior, substance abuse, and suicidal risk behavior) over 18 months for youth aged 11 to 15 years at the time of the baseline interview.

National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW) sponsored by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families
program source code

Measures that can be created using the SAS code to subset the NSCAW data and for the Chapter 2 analyses include age at baseline (6 to 10 years), caregiver-reported behaviors of aggression, a new report(s) of abuse or neglect involving the child since the last interview, child characteristics (academic achievement, social skills, depression, hyperactivity-impulsivity-attention (HIA) problems, and peer rejection), and caregiver characteristics (domestic violence, parental arrest, parent substance abuse, and poverty), and a child cumulative risk score. Measures that can be created using the SAS code to create the subsets and for the Chapter 3 analyses include age at baseline (11 to 15 years), caregiver-reported behaviors of aggression and delinquency, child self-report of delinquency, child characteristics (hyperactivity-impulsivity-attention problems, social skills, academic achievement, depression, aggression, substance abuse, and risky sexual behavior), peer characteristics (deviant peer associations and peer rejection), and caregiver characteristics (relatedness to caregiver, caregiver monitoring of youth, discipline, and poverty level). A rater variable created for Chapters 2 and 3 indicated if the caregiver rating behavior at baseline and 18 months was the same, different, or could not be determined. Measures that can be created using the SAS code to create the subsets and for the Chapter 4 analyses include age at baseline (11 to 15 years), risky behaviors (risky sexual behavior, substance abuse, and suicidal behavior), child characteristics (academic achievement, school engagement, social skills, depression, aggression, HIA problems, externalizing behaviors, and sexually assaultive behavior), peer characteristics (deviant peer associations and peer rejection), and caregiver characteristics (relatedness to caregiver, caregiver monitoring of youth, discipline, and poverty level), and a parent cumulative risk score. Variables from the NSCAW data used in the SAS code include the child's gender and race/ethnicity, child maltreatment type, child welfare service setting, and sample weights.

2005-07-06

2005-07-06

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Wall, Ariana E. Problem Behaviors in Maltreated Children and Youth: Influential Child, Peer, and Caregiver Characteristics, 1999-2000 [United States]. ICPSR04258-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-07-06. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04258.v1

The SAS code includes use of the sample weights from the NSCAW data.

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.