Price Quotations in Early United States Securities Markets, 1790-1860 (ICPSR 4053)

Published: Aug 24, 2005 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Richard E. Sylla, New York University. Stern School of Business; Jack W. Wilson, North Carolina State University; Robert E. Wright, New York University. Stern School of Business

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04053.v1

Version V1

The dataset is a compilation of prices of public securities (equities and bonds) traded in nine United States securities markets and in London during the period between the United States Revolutionary and Civil Wars. The data were gathered by scanning early United States periodicals chronicling the period from 1786-1862. The data were concentrated on what were termed "runs" of securities quotations broken down by days, weeks, or months for each of the ten cities in the data set. Runs are series of bids and offer quotes for different securities and maturities. Within each part (market), the data were divided by issuer sectors or types. There may be some redundancy in the data, because when there was doubt about categorizing similar issues under a key code they were categorized under separate codes.

Sylla, Richard E., Wilson, Jack W., and Wright, Robert E. Price Quotations in Early United States Securities Markets, 1790-1860  . Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-08-24. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04053.v1

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National Science Foundation (SES-9730692)
1790 -- 1860
1997 -- 2002

(1) The SAS and SPSS files replace the Microsoft Excel and Access files as the sources of data for this study. Microsoft Excel and Access files will not be released, so please ignore references to them in the documentation. (2) Some variables, for example, F2160a, contain no data but were included because they were in the original datasets. (3) Dates were formatted by the year followed by the month and then day. An example is 1798.0828 which would be read as August 28, 1798. (4) During data collection, if a price clearly indicated a fraction but either the numerator or the denominator was unclear, a fraction of one half, transcribed as 0.5, was assumed. (5) Quotations of equities may refer to price, in dollars, or percentage of par value. As a general rule, equities in the New York dataset were quoted as percentage of par value. (6) In the London dataset, most equity prices were quoted in pounds sterling. In some cases, like the Bank of the United States, prices were given in United States dollars. (7) Abrupt shifts in quoted prices may have been due to actual changes in stock market prices or may reflect changes in the stock's par value or in the basis of quotation.

The data were compiled from reports about stock, equities, and bonds prices. Not every periodical and price was included. Instead, the included information chronicled price quotation trends and runs during the given time period.

Ten cities in the United States and England considered major securities markets during the time period of 1790-1860.

Cities

Charleston City Gazette, 1800-1832

New Orleans Louisiana Advertiser, 1826-1835

New Orleans Daily Delta, 1845-1863

Louisiana Advertiser, 1820

Alexandria Gazette, 1808-1820

Lyford's Baltimore Price Current, 1839-1849

Boston Gazette, 1810-1815

Richmond Whig, 1837-1857

Grotjan's Philadelphia Public Sale Report and General Price Current, 1816-1830

Southern Patriot and Commercial Advertiser, 1814-1843

Baltimore [Weekly] Price Current, 1803-1860

Boston Courier, 1787-1841

New York Daily Advertiser, 1790-1795

New York Price Current, 1797-1830

Boston Daily Commercial Gazette, 1830-1831

Louisiana Gazette New Orleans Advertiser, 1804-1812

Charleston Mercury and Morning Advertiser, 1822-1860

New Jersey Telegraph McIntyre's Bank Note List and Prices Current, 1840

Merchants' Daily Advertiser, 1797-1798

Charleston Courier Lettersheet Prices Current, 1833-1841

New York Daily Gazette, 1791-1795

New Orleans Price Current, Commercial Intelligence and Merchants' Transcript, 1835-1860

Boston Patriot, 1815

Southern Intelligencer, 1822

Alexandria Advertiser, 1806-1808

New York Journal, 1792-1799

Philadelphia Commercial List, 1850

Boston Daily Courier, 1852-1860

Boston Daily Centinel and Gazette, 1836-1840

American Beacon and Commercial Diary, 1815-1833

Finlay's American Naval and Commercial Register, 1795-1798

New Orleans Argus, 1824-1830

Advertiser, 1799-1850

Boston Columbia Centinel, 1790-1840

Howard's Prices Current, 1832

San Francisco Shipping List and Prices Current, 1852

Baltimore Patriot Mercantile Advertiser, 1813-1830

New Orleans Price Current and Commercial Intelligencer, 1824-1830

Charleston Carolina Gazette, 1823-1840

The Diary, or, Loudon's Register, 1792

Hope's Philadelphia Price Current, 1805-1813

Baltimore Sun, 1847-1859

Massachusetts Magazine, 1789-1794

Boston Shipping List, Prices Current, 1843-1850

Poulson's American Daily Advertiser, 1833

Charleston Courier, 1803-1849

Pelosi's Marine List and Price Current, 1791-1793

Philadelphia Public Sale Report a.k.a. Philadelphia Price Current, 1827-1849

Boston Daily Advertiser, 1823-1836

Richmond Enquirer, 1804-1860

American Price Current, 1786

administrative records data

2005-08-24

2005-08-24

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Sylla, Richard E., Jack W. Wilson, and Robert E. Wright. PRICE QUOTATIONS IN EARLY UNITED STATES SECURITIES MARKETS, 1790-1860. ICPSR04053-v1. New York, NY: New York University. Stern School of Business [producer], 2002. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-08-24. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR04053.v1

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

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