American Community Survey, 2011-2015 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract (ICPSR 36854)

Version Date: Aug 15, 2017 View help for published

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United States. Bureau of the Census

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36854.v1

Version V1

The American Community Survey (ACS) is an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population every year -- giving communities the information they need to plan investments and services. The 5-year public use microdata sample (PUMS) for 2011-2015 is a subset of the 2011-2011 ACS sample. It contains the same sample as the combined PUMS 1-year files for 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. This data collection provides a person-level subset of 129,895 respondents whose occupations were coded as arts-related in the 2011-2015 ACS PUMS.

The 2011-2015 PUMS is the seventh 5-year file published by the ACS. This data collection contains five years of data for the population from households and the group quarters (GQ) population. The GQ population and population from households are all weighted to agree with the ACS counts which are an average over the five year period (2011-2015). The ACS sample was selected from all counties across the nation.

The ACS provides social, housing, and economic characteristics for demographic groups covering a broad spectrum of geographic areas in the United States. Demographic variables include sex, age, relationship of person to the selected respondent, race, and Hispanic origin. Social characteristics variables include school enrollment, educational attainment, marital status, fertility, grandparents caring for children, veteran status, type of disability, health insurance, place of birth, United States citizenship status, year of entry, year of naturalization, language spoken at home, and ancestry. Variables focusing on economic characteristics include employment status, commuting to work, occupation, industry, class of worker, income and benefits, and poverty status.

United States. Bureau of the Census. American Community Survey, 2011-2015 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-08-15. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36854.v1

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Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA)

Users of the data must agree to the Terms of Use presented on the NADAC Website and available through the link in each codebook.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2010-11 -- 2015-12
2010-11 -- 2015-12

This data collection does not contain records for people in Puerto Rico.

Users are strongly encouraged to read all documentation including sampling, sampling errors, weights, and imputation prior to analyzing the data. Documentation is available for download with this collection.

Occasionally, response categories used in the ACS data files must change. This may cause a multi-year PUMS file to carry two or more variables to replace the original single variable seen in the 1-year PUMS. This happens because of changes in the classification systems used for analysis of the economy as well as changes in the detailed race, ancestry, place of birth codes and definitions of Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs).

The 2011-2015 5-year PUMS has seventeen sets of dual variables since many detailed variables were revised for the 2012 data products. For a complete list of the dual variables, see the "Read Me" section of the Technical User Guide for the 2011-2015 5-year PUMS and the PUMS Data Dictionary for more information on these variables.

The smallest geographic unit that is identified is the Public Use Microdata Area (PUMA), which is based on a population size of initially around 100,000 or more. There are two sets of PUMAs on the 2011-2015 ACS PUMS. PUMS records from 2011 have PUMA codes which were created from the 2000 Census 5 percent PUMS data files. PUMS records from 2012 and later have PUMA codes based on the 2010 Census data. The older records do not have the 2010 PUMA codes, while the 2012 and later records do not have the 2000-based 5 percent PUMA codes. This avoids the risk of disclosure of the location of individual housing units or group quarters.

This data collection includes a verification file that provides estimates for selected characteristics provided to assist data users in determining if they are correctly using the weights to compute estimates. Some of these estimates may be different from the estimates for the same characteristics published in the American FactFinder. Users can find the verification file in the Technical User Guide. For an explanation of these differences, please refer to the "Accuracy of the Data" section of the Technical User Guide.

If PUMS users want to compare the 2011-2015 5-year PUMS estimates to 2010-2014 PUMS, or want to reuse a program written for 2010-2014 5-year PUMS data, review "Read Me" section in the Technical User Guide about variables with changes between 2014 and 2015. For more details on the changes, see both the 2010-2014 and 2011-2015 5-year PUMS Data Dictionaries and Code Lists.

Variables added since previous 5-year PUMS: FFINCP, FGRNTP, FHINCP, FPERNP, FPINCP, FPRIVCOVP, FPUBCOVP, FSMOCP, FDISP.

Variables with new or modified codes since the previous 5-year PUMS: ADJHSG, ADJINC, CITWP12, MARHYP12, SERIALNO, YBL, YOEP12.

Variables with cosmetic changes to variable labels or value labels: FER, GRNTP, GRPIP, TEL.

Due to the limit in the number of allowable rows of 65,536 and allowable columns of 256 in Excel 97-2003 (file ending, xls), the Excel file being distributed with this collection is in the later version of Excel (file ending of xlsx).

The data collection provides the artist extract of the 2011-2015 ACS PUMS. The ACS is an ongoing statistical survey that samples a small percentage of the population every year -- giving communities the information they need to plan investments and services.

The 2011-2015 PUMS sample is the same sample found in each of the 1-year PUMS files for the years 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015. It contains five percent of the housing units and five percent of the GQ persons plus some imputed GQ persons in the United States weighted to represent the average population during five years. For this data collection, a subset of 129,895 respondents whose occupations were coded as arts-related in the 2011-2015 ACS PUMS was created.

The American Community Survey (ACS) and consists of two separate samples: housing unit (HU) addresses and residents of group quarters (GQ) facilities. The Census Bureau derives the sampling frames from which it draws these samples from the Census Bureau's Master Address File (MAF). The MAF is the Census Bureau's official inventory of known living quarters and selected nonresidential units in the United States.

The Census Bureau selects independent HU address samples for each of the 3,143 counties and county equivalents in the United States, including the District of Columbia. Full-implementation samples of GQ facilities and persons are selected independently within each state, including the District of Columbia. In 2004, the bureau selected samples of HU addresses for every county and county equivalent for field data collection in 2005. Each year from 2005-2010, we selected approximately 2.9 million HU addresses in the U.S. Beginning in 2011, Census implemented the following changes to the ACS sample designs:

  • Increased the HU sample in June 2011, bringing the size of the sample selected to 3.54 million addresses per year.
  • Added several new HU sampling rates that better control the allocation of the sample and improve estimate reliability for small areas.
  • Increased the follow-up sample to 100 percent in select geographic areas.

In addition, starting in 2013, the Census bureau restricted the assignment of the GQ sample for college dorms to the non-summer months (January-April, September-December).

Full-implementation samples of GQ facilities and persons are selected independently within each state, including the District of Columbia. This began in 2006. In 2006 and 2007, the ACS and the PRCS included approximately 2.5 percent of the expected number of residents in GQ facilities. Beginning in 2008, the bureau increased the sampling rates in 16 states with small GQ populations to meet publication thresholds. See Chapters 7 and 8 in the American Community Survey Design and Methodology Report for further details about the data collection methods.

Longitudinal: Trend / Repeated Cross-section

All persons in households and group quarters in the United States with one or more persons having a detailed occupation code considered "artist" by National Endowment for the Arts.

individual
survey data

The ACS provides social, housing, and economic characteristics for demographic groups covering a broad spectrum of geographic areas in the United States. Demographic variables include sex, age, relationship of person to the selected respondent, race, and Hispanic origin. Social characteristics variables include school enrollment, educational attainment, marital status, fertility, grandparents caring for children, veteran status, type of disability, health insurance, place of birth, United States citizenship status, year of entry, year of naturalization, language spoken at home, and ancestry. Variables focusing on economic characteristics include employment status, commuting to work, occupation, industry, class of worker, income and benefits, and poverty status.

2017-08-15

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • United States. Bureau of the Census. American Community Survey, 2011-2015 [United States]: Public Use Microdata Sample: Artist Extract. ICPSR36854-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-08-15. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36854.v1

2017-08-15 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

The data contain weight variables:

  • PWGTP: Person's weight for generating statistics on individuals (such as age). This weight reflects the probability of selection and is adjusted for interviewed households to account for noninterviews.
  • PWGTP1-PWGTP80: Replicate weighting variables, used for generating the most accurate standard errors for individuals.

For additional details about the weight variable and replicate weights, users should refer to relevant sections of the Technical User Guide, ACS PUMS Handbook, and the American Community Survey Design and Methodology Report.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

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This study is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Data on Arts & Culture (NADAC). NADAC is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.