Racial Neighborhood Inequality in the United States, 1980-2010 (ICPSR 36626)

Published: Nov 3, 2016

Principal Investigator(s):
Glenn Firebaugh, The Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute; Chad Farrell, University of Alaska - Anchorage

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36626.v1

Version V1

This project examined economic differences in the neighborhoods where whites, blacks, Hispanics, and Asians live in the U.S. Although it is commonly believed that blacks and Hispanics generally live in neighborhoods where poverty rates are higher than they are in the neighborhoods where whites and Asians live, very little research has tracked the change in racial disparities in neighborhood conditions over time. In prior research, this project's investigators found that racial differences in neighborhood economic conditions have diminished in the U.S. Since 1980 the decline in racial neighborhood inequality has been much faster than the decline in racial residential segregation. Because prior research on neighborhoods has focused on change in the residential segregation of different racial and ethnic groups, the trend in racial neighborhood inequality has been largely overlooked, and its causes are unknown. The objective of this project is to account for the decline in racial neighborhood inequality by investigating why it has declined faster in some metropolitan areas than in others.

Firebaugh, Glenn, and Farrell, Chad. Racial Neighborhood Inequality in the United States, 1980-2010. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-11-03. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36626.v1

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National Science Foundation (BCS 1260362)

1980 -- 2010

These data are being released in BETA version to facilitate early access to the study for research purposes. This collection has not been fully processed by DSDR or ICPSR at this time; the original materials provided by the principal investigator were only converted to other file types for ease of use.

Data for both datasets originated from the US Census. Please note, however, that the tract numbers contained in dataset 2 (RNI Tract) have been anonymized.

The objective of this project is to account for the decline in racial neighborhood inequality by investigating why it has declined faster in some metropolitan areas than in others. The investigators theorize that this largely-unnoticed decline in racial neighborhood inequality is attributable to the rising importance of income and the declining importance of race as factors influencing where people reside.

Metropolitan Area

U.S. Census

census/enumeration data

2016-11-03

2016-11-03

The data are not weighted.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

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This study was originally processed, archived, and disseminated by Data Sharing for Demographic Research (DSDR), a project funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).