U.S. County-Level Natality and Mortality Data, 1915-2007 (ICPSR 36603)

Version Date: May 2, 2018 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Martha Bailey, University of Michigan; Karen Clay, Carnegie-Mellon University; Price Fishback, University of Arizona; Michael R. Haines, Colgate University; Shawn Kantor, Florida State University; Edson Severnini, Carnegie-Mellon University; Anna Wentz, Brown University

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36603.v2

Version V2 ()

  • V2 [2018-05-02]
  • V1 [2017-05-04] unpublished

This collection contains information on county-level vital events that occurred in the United States from 1915-2007. When sources allow, data are disaggregated by county of occurrence, county of residence, and race. The data include information on vital events such as the number of infant deaths, births to unmarried women, births in the presence of hospital attendants, and infant birth weight.

Michigan Institute for Teaching and Research in Economics (MITRE), United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health (R03HD058065, R03HD058065-01A1, R01HD070950-02, R01HD057929), National Science Foundation (SES-0617972, SES-0214483, SES-0080324, SBR-9708098, SES-135744, SES-1061927, SES- 0921732), Banfi Vinters Chair at Colgate University, Koch Cancer Foundation, Center for Electricity Industry Studies, Heinz College, Berkman Fund at Carnegie-Mellon University

County

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1915-01-01 -- 2007-12-31
As a benefit to the ICPSR membership, this data collection was professionally curated and enhanced by ICPSR data processors. The curated data are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions. The openICPSR self-published version of the project is freely available to the general public in the original condition deposited (no curation) at http://doi.org/10.3886/E100229V4.

For more information on how the data were compiled and standardized, please reference the P.I. Documentation section of the ICPSR codebook.

County names are not standardized across time. Users should refer to the documentation for ICPSR Study 6576 to collapse their data to consistent geographic units for the relevant time period of their study. This collection includes aggregate data from ICPSR Study 2896 and the Natality Detail File Series.
Cross-sectional

Live births and deaths in United States counties between 1915 and 2007.

County

Data were collected from various government sources dating from 1917 to 2014.

administrative records data, aggregate data, census/enumeration data

2016-10-27

2018-05-02

2018-05-02 Data file and documentation were updated to include six additional variables describing updated counts of population and mortality.

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Bailey, Martha, Karen Clay, Price Fishback, Michael R. Haines, Shawn Kantor, Edson Severnini, and Anna Wentz. U.S. County-Level Natality and Mortality Data, 1915-2007. ICPSR36603-v2. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2018-05-02. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36603.v2

2016-10-27 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

The data do not contain any weight variables.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

ICPSR logo

This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.