The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV), 1995-2015 [United States] (ICPSR 36499)

Version Date: Jun 30, 2017 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Bruce Taylor, NORC at the University of Chicago; Elizabeth Mumford, NORC at the University of Chicago

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36499.v1

Version V1

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV) examines the changing nature of adolescent dating relationships, particularly those marked by adolescent relationship abuse (ARA). More specifically, this study was designed to produce nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of multiple forms of ARA among youth (ages 10-18), to document the characteristics of abusive relationships during adolescence, to assess ARA risk factors, and to situate these estimates within the environment of adolescents' key social relationships and communications.

STRiV includes individual data from a nationally representative sample of households with at least one resident youth. Baseline and follow-up surveys were completed using a secure web survey with toll-free telephone and online help available.

Taylor, Bruce, and Mumford, Elizabeth. The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV), 1995-2015 [United States]. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-06-30. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36499.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2011-WG-BX-0020)

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Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reason for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1995 -- 2015
2013-10 -- 2014-01 (Wave 1), 2014-10 -- 2015-05 (Wave 2)

These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV) examined the changing nature of adolescent dating relationships, particularly those marked by adolescent relationship abuse (ARA). More specifically, this study was designed to produce nationally representative estimates of the prevalence of multiple forms of ARA among youth (ages 10-18), to document the characteristics of abusive relationships during adolescence, to assess ARA risk factors, and to situate these estimates within the environment of adolescents' key social relationships and communications.

The goals of this study included the following:

  1. Provide a national portrait of the prevalence of varying categories of ARA victimization and perpetration, including levels of physical and emotional injury, and describe how exposure to these forms of ARA varies by gender, socio-economic status and other key demographic characteristics.
  2. Identify specific conditional attitudes, dating relationship characteristics, and peer network dynamics associated with ARA risk, and to determine whether these pathways are uniquely gendered.
  3. Investigate specific consequences of ARA to dating relationships, and whether the adolescent discloses information about ARA incidents to peers and others and their responses.

Researchers recruited a nationally representative sample of 5,105 households with at least one resident youth between the ages of 10 and 18 to complete an adult parent or caregiver baseline survey and a separate child survey online from October 2013 to January 2014. Of the 5,105 recruited households, 556 of the sample actively refused to participate in the study and 1,816 did not respond to the invitation. While the GfK/KnowledgePanel used to collect respondents consisted of a database of resident children, a further 279 households were screened ineligible (for example, the expected youth did not reside in the household), equivalent to about 7% of the responding sample. The 2,354 completed youth surveys represent a participation rate of 50% among eligible households. A somewhat larger group of parents agreed to do the baseline survey (n=2,645); 2,354 of the children of these parents completed a baseline survey.

If the recipient parent or adult caregiver (PCG) consented to participate, a web survey algorithm randomly chose an eligible child in that household to participate in the study. Next, the participating child and PCG received an invitation by e-mail to complete the surveys, which were presented sequentially with child assent required prior to child participation. For the youth survey, the PCG consent rate (for self and child participation) was 82.6%, and the child assent rate was 98.3%. Communications with the PCG stressed the importance of allowing the selected child to complete the survey privately. While the 40-minute youth survey was available in English or Spanish, few youth respondents selected the Spanish option (n=128, 5%). Each youth and parent was provided a small cash incentive ($10 each) for completing the baseline survey.

A similar survey was administered about one year later and included 1,471 parent-child dyads completing the Wave 2 survey (62.5% of the 2,354 original parent-child dyads). Each youth and parent was provided a small cash ($10 each) incentive for completing the Wave 2 survey

Respondents to the National Survey on Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV) were recruited from the GfK/KnowledgePanel, a national household address-based probability sample (50,000+ members ages 18 and older) of the United States. A full description of the panel is available from GfK.

From an address-based sampling (ABS) frame covering approximately 97% of U.S. households, randomly sampled households were invited to join KnowledgePanel through postal invitations (English and Spanish) and by telephone follow-up. Using dual sample frames, panel members were further recruited via listed and unlisted telephone numbers, telephone and non-telephone households, and cell phone only households, as well as households with and without internet access. To assure national representativeness, researchers applied the KnowledgePanel statistical weights (see "Weights" below).

Longitudinal: Panel

US households with at least one resident youth age 10-18.

Individual
survey data

STRiV includes the following variables:

  • demographic variables (gender, age, race/ethnicity, language, education, employment status, U.S. Census region, metropolitan area, and Internet access);
  • household composition including gender and age of all children between ages of 10 and 18;
  • parent's characterization of child's traits (e.g. athletic, angry, often upset);
  • parent's characterization of relationship with child and partner;
  • parent's beliefs about child's current or future dating behavior;
  • parent's opinions about and/or perpetration of behaviors related to intimate partner violence
  • child's characterization of relationship with parent;
  • child's characterization of child's traits (e.g. even-tempered, angry)
  • child's beliefs about dating relationships, including balance of power (e.g. girls should have the same freedom as boys);
  • child's relationship experience;
  • child's opinions about behaviors related to intimate partner violence;
  • child's experiences with intimate partner violence (victimization and/or perpetration);
  • child's experiences with sexual harassment and abuse (victimization and/or perpetration);
  • child's participation in illegal activities;
  • child's characterization of major friendships;
  • 50% of eligible households participated in the baseline survey. 62.5% of households completing the baseline survey also participated in the Wave 2 follow-up.

    2017-06-30

    2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
    • Taylor, Bruce, and Elizabeth Mumford. The National Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence (STRiV), 1995-2015 [United States]. ICPSR36499-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2017-06-30. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36499.v1

    2017-06-30 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

    • Performed recodes and/or calculated derived variables.

    The KnowledgePanel statistical weights take into account a range of sampling and non-sampling error (e.g., non-response to panel recruitment and panel attrition). This panel base weight is then employed in a probability proportional to size (PPS) selection method for drawing sub-samples from KnowledgePanel. Using demographic and geographic distributions from the most recent monthly U.S. Census Current Population Survey as benchmarks, a sample-specific post-stratification process was conducted (applying an iterative raking procedure) to adjust for survey nonresponse and for any elements related to the study-specific sample design (such as subgroup oversamples of households with youth). The demographic variables used were gender, age, race/ethnicity, education, U.S. Census region, metropolitan area, and Internet access, resulting in a weighted sample distribution that closely approximates the 2010 U.S. Census estimates.

    Notes

    • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

    • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

    • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

    • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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    This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.