National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence II, 1993-2012 [United States] (ICPSR 36177)

Published: Oct 11, 2016 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
David Finkelhor, Crimes Against Children Research Center, University of New Hampshire; Heather Turner, Crimes Against Children Research Center, University of New Hampshire

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36177.v1

Version V1

NatSCEV II 2011

The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) series involved three rounds of data collection, NatSCEV I (baseline), this study NatSCEV II, and NatSCEV III. For more information on other parts to the series, please use the following links:

NatSCEV I (ICPSR 35203) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35203.v1

NatSCEV III (ICPSR 36523) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36523.v1

The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence II was designed to obtain lifetime and one-year incidence estimates of a comprehensive range of childhood victimizations across gender, race, and developmental stage. Conducted between March, 2011 and January, 2012, it assessed the experiences of a nationally representative sample of 4,503 children aged 1 month to 18 years living in the contiguous United States (excluding New Hampshire).

A nationwide sample which excluded any phone numbers with area codes assigned within the state of New Hampshire was constructed using four frames: (1) 801,317 landline telephone numbers from which telephone households could be drawn by random digit dialing (RDD); (2) 5,000 cell-phone telephone numbers from which a sample of cell phone users could be drawn by RDD; (3) an address-based sample (ABS) of 70,924 cell phone and residential numbers; and (4) a pre-screened sample of 3,573 telephone numbers of households with children from a recent national RDD survey. The compiled frame yielded 3,259 residential RDD interviews, 31 cell phone RDD interviews, 750 ABS interviews, and 463 pre-screened sample interviews for a total of 4,503 interviews.

A short interview was conducted with an adult caregiver (usually a parent) to obtain family demographic information. One child was randomly selected from all eligible children in a household by selecting the child with the most recent birthday. If the selected child was 1 month to 9 years old, the main interview was conducted with the caregiver. If the selected child was 10-17 years old, the main interview was conducted with the child.

The survey used an enhanced version of the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ), an inventory of childhood victimization. This version of the JVQ obtains reports on 53 forms of offenses against youth that cover six general areas of concern including: conventional crime, child maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual victimization, witnessing and indirect victimization, and internet victimization. Follow-up questions for each victimization item gathered additional information about the victimization incident.

Finkelhor, David, and Turner, Heather. National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence II, 1993-2012 [United States]. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-10-11. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36177.v1

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United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (2009-JW-BX-0060 (2009-2011)), United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (2010-JF-FX-0010 (2010-2013)), United States Department of Justice. Office of Justice Programs. National Institute of Justice (2010-IJ-CX-0021 (2011-2013))

Census Region

Access to these data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1993 -- 2012
2011-03 -- 2012-01

Users are strongly encouraged to consult the User Guide (available for download with the study materials) for an orientation to analyzing the data.

The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) series involved three rounds of data collection, NatSCEV I (baseline), this study NatSCEV II, and NatSCEV III. For more information on other parts to the series, please use the following links:

NatSCEV I (ICPSR 35203) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35203.v1

NatSCEV III (ICPSR 36523) - http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36523.v1

To obtain lifetime and one year incidence estimates of a comprehensive range of childhood victimizations across gender, race, and developmental stage using the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ).

A nationwide sample which excluded any phone numbers with area codes assigned within the state of New Hampshire was constructed using four frames: (1) 801,317 landline telephone numbers from which telephone households could be drawn by random digit dialing (RDD); (2) 5,000 cell-phone telephone numbers from which a sample of cell phone users could be drawn by RDD; (3) an address-based sample (ABS) of 70,924 cell phone and residential numbers; and (4) a pre-screened sample of 3,573 telephone numbers of households with children from a recent national RDD survey. The compiled frame yielded 3,259 residential RDD interviews, 31 cell phone RDD interviews, 750 ABS interviews, and 463 pre-screened sample interviews for a total of 4,503 completed interviews.

A nationwide sample which excluded any phone numbers with area codes assigned within the state of New Hampshire was constructed using four frames: (1) 801,317 landline telephone numbers from which telephone households could be drawn by random digit dialing (RDD); (2) 5,000 cell-phone telephone numbers from which a sample of cell phone users could be drawn by RDD; (3) an address-based sample (ABS) of 70,924 cell phone and residential numbers; and (4) a pre-screened sample of 3,573 telephone numbers of households with children from a recent national RDD survey. The compiled frame yielded 3,259 residential RDD interviews, 31 cell phone RDD interviews, 750 ABS interviews, and 463 pre-screened sample interviews for a total of 4,503 interviews. A short interview was conducted with an adult caregiver (usually a parent) to obtain family demographic information. One child was randomly selected from all eligible children in a household by selecting the child with the most recent birthday. If the selected child was 1 month to 9 years old, the main interview was conducted with the caregiver. If the selected child was 10-17 years old, the main interview was conducted with the child.

Cross-sectional

Children and youth ages 1 month to 18 years residing in the contiguous United States excluding New Hampshire

Individual, Household
survey data

The National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence (NATSCEV) II consists of multiple sections: parent screener, background questions, Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) screener questions, social support, mental health, NATSCEV screener questions, JVQ and NATSCEV follow up questions, lifetime and past year adversity, internet victimization, community disorder, delinquency, self-concept, parental conflict, alcohol use, prevention program participation, and exposure to family violence follow up questions. Each section has been derived from the data collection instrument and is described in detail below. The dataset includes 3,742 variables with a total of 4503 observations.

  1. Parent Screener - Variables pertaining to demographic information such as social economic status, race and ethnicity, age of respondent, date of birth, marital status, household composition and educational level. In addition, variables pertaining to mental health and general health for parent and youth are included.
  2. Background Questions - Respondents were asked school and education related questions such as how much does the respondent like to read and how much homework does the respondent usually do. In addition, respondents were asked about extracurricular activities such as after school program participation and leisure time.
  3. Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ) Screener Questions - Variables pertain to conventional crime, child maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual assault, witnessing and indirect victimization.
  4. Social Support - Variables pertaining to the perceived amount of social support a respondent received. For example, "My family really tries to help me".
  5. Mental Health - Variables pertaining to mental health such as difficulty concentrating and focusing, difficulty sleeping, aggression, fear and anxiety.
  6. Supplemental Screener Questions - Variables pertaining to exposure to community violence, exposure to family violence and abuse, and school violence and threat.
  7. JVQ and NATSCEV Follow-up Questions - Respondents who reported victimization events are asked follow-up questions (e.g. How many times did this happen during the lifetime).
  8. Life Time and Past Adversity - Variables pertaining to past adversity such as family drug use, bad accidents and illnesses, natural disasters, and death of a loved one.
  9. Internet Victimization - Contains two variables that ask about Internet harassment or unwanted sexual encounters experienced.
  10. Community Disorder - Variables pertaining to community disorder such as drug selling in the community, policing in the community, gangs, and neighborhood environment.
  11. Delinquency - Variables pertaining to self-reported delinquency including physical violence, graffiti, drug use, and theft.
  12. Self-Concept - Variables pertaining to positive and negative self-concept characteristics.
  13. Parental Conflict - Includes variables pertaining to how often a respondent sees their parents arguing and whether the respondent's parents get really mad when arguing.
  14. Alcohol Use - Variables pertaining to the frequency and amount of alcoholic beverages consumed.
  15. Prevention Programs - Includes variables pertaining to exposure to school or community programs dealing with topics such as bullying, handling conflict, and dating violence.
  16. Exposure to Family Violence (Extended Follow-Up) - Includes variables regarding specific responses from respondent such as child's traumatic response, criminal justice response, professional assistance response, and the family response to one or more family violence incidents.

In addition to variables derived from the data collection instrument, variables related to basic demographics (e.g., race, income), victimization that occurred in the past year, and indirect victimization have been calculated by the Principle Investigators and included in the dataset. The syntax used for calculating these variables are located in Appendix A of the codebook.

The American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) Cooperation Rate #4 (the proportion of all cases interviewed of all eligible units ever contacted excluding those incapable of cooperating but including partial interviews), averaged across sampling frames was 58.2 percent, and the average AAPOR Response Rate #4 was 44.6 percent.

Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ), an inventory of childhood victimization that covers a wide range of events, including nonviolent victimizations and events that children and parents do not typically conceptualize as crimes. The JVQ version used in the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence II obtains reports on 53 forms of offenses against youth that cover six general areas of concern: conventional crime, child maltreatment, peer and sibling victimization, sexual assault, witnessing and indirect victimization, and internet victimization.

2016-08-23

2016-10-11

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Finkelhor, David, and Heather Turner. National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence II, 1993-2012 [United States]. ICPSR36177-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2016-08-23. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36177.v1

2016-10-11 ICPSR updated the study dataset to include revised variable and value labels to more clearly define abbreviations used by the Principal Investigators.

2016-09-19 Updated study to archive internal processing files.

2016-08-23 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Performed consistency checks.
  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

The provided weight (SESTRWEIGHT2 - FINAL SAMPLING WEIGHT) can be used to obtain analysis estimates that are representative of the national population of 0 to 17 year-olds. The weighting plan for the survey was a multistage sequential process of weighting the sample to correct for study design and demographic variations in non-response. Specifically, weights were applied to adjust for (1) differing probabilities of household selection based on sampling frames, (2) variations in within-household selection resulting from different numbers of eligible children across households, and (3) differences in sample proportions according to sex, age, income, census region, race/ethnicity, number of adults and children in the household, and telephone status (cell only, mostly cell, or other) relative to the 2010 American Community Survey Public Use Microdata Sample.

Additional information as to the construction of the final sampling weight can be found in the Methods Report included in this study release.

Notes

  • These data are part of NACJD's Fast Track Release and are distributed as they were received from the data depositor. The files have been zipped by NACJD for release, but not checked or processed except for the removal of direct identifiers. Users should refer to the accompanying readme file for a brief description of the files available with this collection and consult the investigator(s) if further information is needed.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This dataset is maintained and distributed by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD), the criminal justice archive within ICPSR. NACJD is primarily sponsored by three agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice: the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.