Primacy in the Effects of Face Exposure: Perception is Influenced More By Faces That Are Seen First (ICPSR 35518)

Published: Nov 7, 2014 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Anthony Little, University of Stirling; Benedict Jones, University of Glasgow; Lisa DeBruine, University of Glasgow

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35518.v1

Version V1

Exposure to faces biases perceptions of subsequently viewed faces. In literature on memory, there are prominent effects of primacy, whereby people remember things better if they are at the beginning of a list. Here we tested for primacy in face exposure by exposing people to faces that had been transformed in opposite directions twice. In one condition, for example, we exposed people to "plus" faces and measured how much they thought "plus" faces appeared normal and then exposed them to "anti" faces and again measured how much they thought "plus" faces appeared normal. A primacy effect would be seen if after the second measurement, judgments of "plus" faces were unchanged from the first measurement whereas a recency effect would be seen if after the second measurement, judgments of "plus" faces were lower than from the first measurement. We found no change in normality judgement between first and second judgments supporting a primacy effect. Our results indicated a primacy effect in adaptation whereby faces seen first affected perception more than faces seen later. This primacy effect could lead to long lasting effects of exposure to faces.

Little, Anthony, Jones, Benedict, and DeBruine, Lisa. Primacy in the Effects of Face Exposure: Perception is Influenced More By Faces That Are Seen First. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2014-11-07. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35518.v1

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This dataset is part of ICPSR's Archives of Scientific Psychology journal database. Users should contact the Editorial Office at the American Psychological Association for information on requesting data access.

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
2005-01-10 -- 2005-02-11
2005-01-10 -- 2005-02-11

This dataset is associated with an in press publication: Little AC, Jones BC, and DeBruine LM. (In Press). Primacy in the effects of face exposure: perception is influenced more by faces that are seen first. Archives of Scientific Psychology.

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Cross-sectional
Individual
experimental data

2014-11-07

2014-11-07

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Little, Anthony, Benedict Jones, and Lisa DeBruine. Primacy in the Effects of Face Exposure: Perception is Influenced More By Faces That Are Seen First. ICPSR35518-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2014-11-07. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR35518.v1

Notes

  • This dataset is part of ICPSR's Archives of Scientific Psychology journal database. Users should contact the Editorial Office at the American Psychological Association for information on requesting data access.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

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Archives of Scientific Psychology

This dataset is made available in connection to an article in Archives of Scientific Psychology, the first open-access, open-methods journal of the American Psychological Association (APA). Archiving and dissemination of this research is part of APA's commitment to collaborative data sharing.