The Effects of Recessions Across Demographic Groups (ICPSR 34702)

Published: Jun 14, 2013

Principal Investigator(s):
Kristie M. Engemann, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; Howard J. Wall, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34702.v1

Version V1

The burdens of a recession are not spread evenly across demographic groups. As the public and media noticed, from the start of the current recession in December 2007 through June 2009 men accounted for more than three-quarters of net job losses. Other differences have garnered less attention but are just as interesting. During the same period, the employment of single people fell at more than twice the rate that it did for married people and the decline for black workers was one and a half times that for white workers. To provide a more complete understanding of the effect of recessions, this paper examines the different effects of this and previous recessions across a range of demographic categories: sex, marital status, race, age, and education level.

Engemann, Kristie M., and Wall, Howard J. The Effects of Recessions Across Demographic Groups. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2013-06-14. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34702.v1

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

1972 -- 2009

The data are distributed as a Microsoft Excel file, which provides data, tables, and figures used in the publication.

These data are part of ICPSR's Publication-Related Archive and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

United States households.

household

census/enumeration data

2013-06-14

2013-06-14

Notes

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