East Asian Social Survey (EASS), Cross-National Survey Data Sets: Culture and Globalization in East Asia, 2008 (ICPSR 34607)

Published: May 1, 2014

Principal Investigator(s):
Ying-Hwa Chang, Institute of Sociology. Academia Sinica; Noriko Iwai, JGSS Research Center. Osaka University of Commerce; Lulu Li, National Survey Research Center. Renmin University of China; Sang-Wook Kim, Survey Research Center. Sungkyunkwan University

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34607.v2

Version V2

The East Asian Social Survey (EASS) is a biennial social survey project that serves as a cross-national network of the following four General Social Survey type surveys in East Asia: Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS), and comparatively examines diverse aspects of social life in these regions. Survey information in this module focuses on leisure and recreational activities, as well as cultural norms and expectations of respondents. Specific questions were asked pertaining to how often respondents watched certain types of movies, dramas, and other forms of entertainment, as well as what country this entertainment was in. Other information collected includes opinion questions, such as qualities preferred in friends, family responsibilities and roles, as well as taste in music, and feelings of closeness to one's country, city or town, and East Asia. Other topics include sources of international news and discussion frequency, countries or regions traveled, as well as where acquaintances live. Additionally, respondents were asked how accepting they would be of people from other countries as coworkers, neighbors, and in marriage. Information was collected regarding foreign practices, whether the respondent was working for a foreign capital company, and the economic environment. Respondents were also asked to provide their family members' and acquaintances' occupations, as well as assess their own proficiency when reading, speaking, and writing in English. Demographic information specific to the respondent and their spouse includes age, sex, marital status, education, employment status and hours worked, occupation, earnings and income, religion, class, size of community, and region.

Chang, Ying-Hwa, Iwai, Noriko, Li, Lulu, and Kim, Sang-Wook. East Asian Social Survey (EASS), Cross-National Survey Data Sets: Culture and Globalization in East Asia, 2008. Ann Arbor, MI: EASSDA [distributor], Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2014-05-01. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34607.v2

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county

EASSDA

Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

2008-06 -- 2008-12

2008-06 -- 2008-12

The East Asian Social Survey (EASS) is based on Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), and Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS), and is distributed by the East Asia Social Survey Data Archive (EASSDA).

Please refer to these related data collections featuring other modules of the East Asian Social Survey (EASS): ICPSR 34606, EAST ASIAN SOCIAL SURVEY (EASS), CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY DATA SETS: FAMILIES IN EAST ASIA, 2006; and ICPSR 34608, EAST ASIAN SOCIAL SURVEY (EASS), CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY DATA SETS: HEALTH AND SOCIETY IN EAST ASIA, 2010.

For additional information on the EAST ASIAN SOCIAL SURVEY (EASS), CROSS-NATIONAL SURVEY DATA SETS: CULTURE AND GLOBALIZATION IN EAST ASIA, 2008, please visit the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) Web site.

The purpose of this study was to provide students and scholars in the social science community with integrated East Asian Social Survey datasets collected by coordinated efforts of the participating institutions in China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan.

For information on study design, users should refer to the Original P.I. Documentation in the ICPSR Codebook, as well as visit the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) Web site.

For information on sampling, users should refer to the Original P.I. Documentation in the ICPSR Codebook, as well as visit the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) Web site.

Cross-sectional

Cross-national network of adult respondents in East Asia that have participated in the Chinese General Social Survey (CGSS), the Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), the Korean General Social Survey (KGSS), and the Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS).

individual

survey data

Response rates for each of the four countries' social surveys (China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan) are the following: China - 47.77 percent (6,300 initial sample size; 3,010 respondents), Japan - 54.0 percent or 60.6 percent by Japanese General Social Survey official formula (4,003 initial sample size; 2,160 respondents), South Korea - 61.0 percent (2,500 initial sample size; 1,508 respondents), and Taiwan - 44.93 percent (4,601 initial sample size; 2,067 respondents).

2013-10-02

2014-05-01

2014-05-01 Revisions of the earnings and household income variables were made by the PI from categorical to continuous.

2013-10-02 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created online analysis version with question text.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

This data collection contains weight variables that should be used during analysis. Please refer to the Original P.I. Documentation as well as visit the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) Web site for more information on weighting.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

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This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.