Intergovernmental Organizations, Socialization, and Member-State Interest Convergence (ICPSR 34387)

Published: Oct 18, 2012

Principal Investigator(s):
David Bearce, University of Colorado-Boulder

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34387.v1

Version V1

This article explores the constructivists' institutional socialization hypothesis, positing that intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) make member-state interests more similar over time, thus promoting interest convergence. We first show how this hypothesis can be tested systematically using relatively new data on dyadic interest similarity and joint structured IGO membership, and then we conduct a series of empirical tests. Our results show strong statistical support for the institutional socialization hypothesis, using both global and more restricted regional samples. We also demonstrate how our results are consistent with a longer-term socialization process and cannot be explained by the short-term effect of institutional information. Finally, we show some limits to the institutional socialization hypothesis. Unstructured IGOs reveal no effect in promoting member-state interest convergence. Following recent theory arguing that great powers in the international system often use IGOs for coercive means, we find that institutional socialization gets weaker as the power imbalance within the dyad grows.

Bearce, David. Intergovernmental Organizations, Socialization, and Member-State Interest Convergence. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2012-10-18. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR34387.v1

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quasi-population of country/years observations

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2012-10-18

2012-10-18

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