Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research (CEDAR): Etiological and Prospective Family Study in Southwestern Pennsylvania, Baseline Data, 1990-2011 (ICPSR 33444)

Published: Aug 10, 2012

Principal Investigator(s):
Ralph E. Tarter, University of Pittsburgh

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR33444.v1

Version V1

The Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research (CEDAR) conducts research on 775 families enrolled in the Center's prospective investigations into the etiology of substance use disorder (SUD). The pro-bands are men with lifetime presence/absence of SUD consequent to use of an illicit drug who have a 10-12 year old biological son or daughter. The biological children of SUD men are assigned to the high average risk (HAR) group whereas offspring of men without SUD, having neither axis 1 disorder ("normal") nor SUD psychiatric disorder, are assigned to the low average risk (LAR) group. A second control group (Psych control) was also collected, in whom the fathers had a lifetime DSM-III-R diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder not related to substance use. The sample sizes are as follows: HAR = 344, LAR = 350, and Psych = 81. The children are currently in varying stages of follow-up evaluation conducted at ages 12-14, 16, 19, and annually thereafter until age 30. CEDAR has already shown that they can predict in 10-12 year old youth cannabis use disorder by age 22 with approximately 70 percent accuracy, thereby substantiating the paradigm, subject recruitment strategy, and measurement protocols. Multidisciplinary research is conducted on family members (father, mother, children) with the objective of elucidating the genetic, bio-behavioral, and environmental factors on development of SUD consequent to use of illegal drugs. Research protocols are organized into three thematically connected research modules (Neurogenetics, Developmental Psychopathology, and Translation) linking etiology and prevention. The research components thus align with the NIH Roadmap model such that basic science informs clinical research leading to prevention guided by an understanding of etiology. In addition to module-level research, faculty also participate in three organizational aims: (1) Devise a practical scale to quantify the transmissible liability to SUD; (2) Empirically test a bio-psychological theory of SUD etiology focusing on off-time maturation leading to psychological dysregulation predisposing to SUD; and, (3) Delineate SUD liability variants within an ontogenetic framework.

Tarter, Ralph E. Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research (CEDAR): Etiological and Prospective Family Study in Southwestern Pennsylvania, Baseline Data, 1990-2011. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2012-08-10. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR33444.v1

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United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse (P50 DA 005605)

Census tract

Access to the CEDAR data is restricted. Users interested in obtaining these data must complete a Restricted Data Use Agreement, specify the reasons for the request, and obtain IRB approval or notice of exemption for their research. Apply for access to these data through the ICPSR data access request system portal, which can be accessed via the study home page. See the ICPSR data access request system portal for information and instructions.

1990 -- 2011

1990-01-05 -- 2011-01-14

For more information regarding the CEDAR study measures, users are encouraged to see the Center for Education and Drug Abuse Research (CEDAR) Web site.

Three groups of male and female children are studied for a 20-year period: (1) Offspring of substance abusing fathers, (2) Offspring of normal fathers, and (3) Offspring of psychiatrically disturbed fathers. The three groups are longitudinally tracked from age 10-12 until they reach age 30 using the following assessment schedule: age 10-12, age 12-14, age 16, age 19-30 (with annual evaluations).

The sample uses a high risk paradigm, in which the families were selected based on a DSM-III-R diagnosis of substance use disorder in the biological father of the index child (High Average Risk, or HAR group) versus NO DSM-III-R psychiatric disorder (Low Average Risk, or LAR group). A second control group (Psych control) was also collected, in whom the fathers had a lifetime DSM-III-R diagnosis of any psychiatric disorder not related to substance use. The sample sizes are as follows: HAR = 344, LAR = 350, and Psych = 81. Citation: Tarter, R.E., Vanyukov, M.M. (2001). Introduction: Theoretical and operational framework for research into the etiology of substance use disorders. Journal of Child and Adolescent Substance Abuse 10 (4):1-12.

Longitudinal: Panel: Continuous

Fathers, mothers, and biological children ages 10-12 in 1990 in Southeastern Pennsylvania whose father had a lifetime presence/absence of substance abuse disorder consequent to use of an illicit drug.

individual; household

survey data

This study utilized the following measurement tools: Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Dimensions of Temperament - Revised (DOTs-R), Family Assessment Measure (FAM), Health Problems Checklist (HPQ), and Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ).

2012-08-10

2012-08-10

2012-08-10 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Created variable labels and/or value labels.
  • Standardized missing values.
  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Notes

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

  • One or more files in this data collection have special restrictions. Restricted data files are not available for direct download from the website; click on the Restricted Data button to learn more.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented.
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This study is maintained and distributed by the National Addiction & HIV Data Archive Program (NAHDAP). NAHDAP is supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).