Global Views 2010: American Public Opinion and Foreign Policy (ICPSR 31022)

Published: Dec 6, 2011

Principal Investigator(s):
Marshall Bouton, Chicago Council on Global Affairs; Steven Kull, University of Maryland. School of Public Policy; Benjamin Page, Northwestern University; Silvia Veltcheva, Chicago Council on Global Affairs; Thomas Wright, Chicago Council on Global Affairs


Version V1

This study is part of a quadrennial series designed to investigate the opinions and attitudes of the general public on matters related to foreign policy, and to define the parameters of public opinion within which decision-makers must operate. This public opinion study of the United States focused on respondents' opinions of the United States' leadership role in the world and the challenges the country faces domestically and internationally. The survey covered the following international topics: relations with other countries, role in foreign affairs, possible threats to vital interests in the next ten years, foreign policy goals, benefits or drawbacks of globalization, situations that might justify the use of United States troops in other parts of the world, the number and location of United States military bases overseas, respondent feelings toward people of other countries, opinions on the influence of other countries in the world and how much influence those countries should have, whether there should be a global regulating body to prevent economic instability, international trade, United States participation in potential treaties, the United States' role in the United Nations and NATO, respondent opinions on international institutions and regulating bodies such as the United Nations, World Trade Organization, and the World Health Organization, whether the United States will continue to be the world's leading power in the next 50 years, democracy in the Middle East and South Korea, the role of the United Nations Security Council, which side the United States should take in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, what measures should be taken to deal with Iran's nuclear program, the military effort in Afghanistan, opinions on efforts to combat terrorism and the use of torture to extract information from prisoners, whether the respondent favors or opposes the government selling military equipment to other nations and using nuclear weapons in various circumstances, the economic development of China, and the conflict between North and South Korea. Domestic issues included economic prospects for American children when they become adults, funding for government programs, the fairness of the current distribution of income in the United States, the role of government, whether the government can be trusted to do what is right, climate change, greenhouse gas emissions, United States' dependence on foreign energy sources, drilling for oil and natural gas off the coast of the United States, and relations with Mexico including such issues as the ongoing drug war, as well as immigration and immigration reform. Demographic and other background information included age, gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, left-right political self-placement, political affiliation, employment status, highest level of education, and religious preference. Also included are household size and composition, whether the respondent is head of household, household income, housing type, ownership status of living quarters, household Internet access, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) status, and region and state of residence.

Bouton, Marshall, Kull, Steven, Page, Benjamin, Veltcheva, Silvia, and Wright, Thomas. Global Views 2010: American Public Opinion and Foreign Policy. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2011-12-06.

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote

John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (09-95379-000-GSS)

Robert R. McCormick Foundation

Korea Foundation (GL 1010105-000228)


2010-06-11 -- 2010-06-22

2010-06-11 -- 2010-06-22

For variable Q1041, the response given by CASEID 2422 exceeds Stata's maximum length of 244 characters for a string variable, thus it appears truncated in the data files. Of note, a data file containing all responses in entirety for this variable has been provided in plain text format; this data file also contains the variable CASEID.

To limit possible disclosure risk, the variables TM_START and TM_FINISH have been dropped from the public-use data.

The total number of interviews is 2,597. "Table 1. Survey Completion Rate" in the "Introduction" section of the Knowledge Networks Field Report: June 2010 and the Global Views 2010: U.S. Public Topline Report shows the total number of interviews as 2,976 and 2,596, respectively.

For information on sampling, please review the "Knowledge Networks Field Report: June 2010" section of the ICPSR codebook.

Adults aged 18 years and older.


survey data

web-based survey

National sample: 66 percent, Midwest sample: 68 percent.



2011-12-06 ICPSR data undergo a confidentiality review and are altered when necessary to limit the risk of disclosure. ICPSR also routinely creates ready-to-go data files along with setups in the major statistical software formats as well as standard codebooks to accompany the data. In addition to these procedures, ICPSR performed the following processing steps for this data collection:

  • Checked for undocumented or out-of-range codes.

Please refer to the "Sample Weighting" section of the Knowledge Networks Field Report for the June 2010 survey in the ICPSR codebook.


  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

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This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.