The Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures (ICPSR 29602)

Published: Nov 1, 2010 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Joel Selway, Brigham Young University

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR29602.v1

Version V1

The data are fully described in "The Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures", forthcoming in Political Analysis and its supplementary appendix. There are 128 countries in the dataset. The Cross-national Indices of Multidimensional Measures of Social Structure (CIMMSS) contains 69 new indices for the following dimensions: Race, Ethnicity, Language, Religion, Income, Geography. There are six different characteristics contained in the dataset: (1) Cross-cutting Cleavages (Cross-cuttingness) definition: The degree groups on a first cleavage are identically distributed amongst groups on a second cleavage. For example, South Africa has a low level of racial-income cross-cuttingness, since Whites have much higher average incomes than Blacks. (2) Sub-group Fractionalization definition: The probability that two randomly chosen individuals in a society belong to the same sub-group (the intersection of two or more group identities/memberships on two or more cleavages). For example, Iraq has three main sub-groups: Arab Sunnis, Arab Sh'ias, and Kurdish Sunnis. (3) Sub-group (Bi)polarization definition: The degree that a country is divided into two equally-sized sub-groups. For example, Northern Ireland has two fairly evenly-sized sub-groups: Irish Catholics and English Protestants. (4) Cross-fractionalization definition: The degree that members of a group on one cleavage are divided into groups on a second cleavage and share membership on the second cleavage with members of other groups on the first cleavage. For example, White Australians are highly fractionalized among religions and share religious membership with other racial groups. (5) Fractionalization definition: The probability that two randomly chosen individuals in a society belong to the same group. For example, individuals in many Latin American countries tend to mostly belong to the same religious group, Catholicism (low fractionalization). (6) (Bi)polarization definition: The degree that a country is divided into two equally-sized sub-groups. For example, Belgium has two fairly equal sized linguistic groups: Walloons (French) and Flemish (Dutch).

Selway, Joel. The Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-01. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR29602.v1

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These data are part of ICPSR's Publication-Related Archive and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

The zipped package contains Microsoft Excel files, a Microsoft Word document, and a Stata file which includes the data, tables, and figures used in the publication.

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2010-11-01

2010-11-01

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Selway, Joel. The Measurement of Cross-cutting Cleavages and Other Multidimensional Cleavage Structures. ICPSR29602-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2010-11-01. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR29602.v1

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  • These data are flagged as replication datasets and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigator(s) if further information is desired.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

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