American National Election Study: 1998 Pilot Study (ICPSR 2693)

Published: Dec 15, 2005 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Virginia Sapiro; Steven J. Rosenstone; National Election Studies

Series:

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02693.v2

Version V2

The 1998 Pilot Study focused on examining and improving the methodology used for future studies in the American National Election Studies series. The study provided an opportunity to test new instrumentation, fine-tune measurement of core concepts, and try out some innovative survey methods. The 1998 Pilot Study, conducted September 8 through November 3, 1998, marked the first time a study was conducted during an election season. Three high-profile gubernatorial contests in California, Illinois, and Georgia were used as a basis for testing instrumentation that can only be analyzed in the context of an electoral campaign and for investigating how to improve the election study's capacity to illuminate the impact of campaigns. Among the concepts covered in the study are political interest, knowledge, ideology, efficacy, trust, mobilization, issue attitudes/awareness keyed to actual campaigns, campaign interest, participation in a campaign, media use, candidate awareness, partisanship, vote intention, certainty of vote, and social context and communication. Several additional measures were piloted, including what part of the day the respondent tended to watch television, new social context and communication variables, need for evaluation, group mobilization, public mood, a new affirmative action variable, perceived tone of the campaign, awareness of campaign issues, and whether the respondent owned stock.

Sapiro, Virginia, Rosenstone, Steven J., and National Election Studies. American National Election Study: 1998 Pilot Study. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2005-12-15. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02693.v2

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote
National Science Foundation (SBR-9707741, SBR-9317631, SES-9209410, SES-9009379,SES-8808361, SES-8341310, SES-8207580, and SOC77-08885)
Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research
1998
1998-09-08 -- 1998-11-03

The variable names in the SAS and SPSS setup files have a "V" prefix, e.g., "V98P003". However, in the codebook, the "V" prefix is omitted.

Random-digit-dialing sample using the Kish method to identify the number, gender, and age of all household members selected, consisting of 1,203 observations.

United States citizens (over age 18 by the day of the election) eligible to vote and residing in California, Illinois, and Georgia households with telephones.

survey data

1999-06-16

2005-12-15

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Sapiro, Virginia, Steven J. Rosenstone, and National Election Studies. American National Election Study: 1998 Pilot Study. ICPSR02693-v2. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2001. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR02693.v2

2005-12-15 On 2005-08-15 new files were added to one or more datasets. These files included additional setup files as well as one or more of the following: SAS program, SAS transport, SPSS portable, and Stata system files. The metadata record was revised 2005-12-15 to reflect these additions.

2001-03-15 An errata file describing minor changes in the documentation and data definition statements has been added to the collection. Also, minor formatting changes have been made to the SAS and SPSS data definition statements.

Notes

  • Data in this collection are available only to users at ICPSR member institutions.

  • The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. Please see version history for more details.
ICPSR logo

This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.