Pandemic Economics: The 1918 Influenza and Its Modern-Day Implications (ICPSR 22680)

Published: Jun 9, 2008

Principal Investigator(s):
Thomas A. Garrett, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22680.v1

Version V1

Many predictions of the economic and social costs of a modern-day pandemic are based on the effects of the influenza pandemic of 1918. Despite killing 675,000 people in the United States and 40 million worldwide, the influenza of 1918 has been nearly forgotten. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the influenza pandemic of 1918 in the United States, its economic effects, and its implications for a modern-day pandemic. The paper provides a brief historical background as well as detailed influenza mortality statistics for cities and states, including those in the Eighth Federal Reserve District, that account for differences in race, income, and place of residence. Information is obtained from two sources: (i) newspaper articles published during the pandemic and (ii) a survey of economic research on the subject.

Garrett, Thomas A. Pandemic Economics: The 1918 Influenza and Its Modern-Day  Implications. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2008-06-09. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR22680.v1

Export Citation:

  • RIS (generic format for RefWorks, EndNote, etc.)
  • EndNote

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis. Research Division

(1) The data are distributed as a Microsoft Excel file, which contains the data and tables used in the publication. (2) These data are part of ICPSR's Publication-Related Archive and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigators if further information is desired.

2008-06-09

2008-06-09

Notes

  • These data are flagged as replication datasets and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigator(s) if further information is desired.

  • The public-use data files in this collection are available for access by the general public. Access does not require affiliation with an ICPSR member institution.

ICPSR logo

This study is provided by ICPSR. ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.