Investment-Specific Technology Growth: Concepts and Recent Estimates (ICPSR 1273)

Published: Apr 18, 2003 View help for published

Principal Investigator(s): View help for Principal Investigator(s)
Michael R. Pakko, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01273.v1

Version V1

The strength of United States productivity growth in recent years has been attributed to technological improvements that are, in some sense, embodied in new types of capital equipment. However, traditional growth theory and growth accounting techniques -- which emphasize the role of disembodied, neutral technological progress -- are deficient in explaining this phenomenon. In this article, the author outlines a model of investment-specific technological change that has become popular for describing the notion of capital-embodied growth and summarizes some recent estimates of the importance of this type of technological progress for assessing United States productivity trends.

Pakko, Michael R. Investment-Specific Technology Growth:  Concepts and Recent Estimates. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2003-04-18. https://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01273.v1

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Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

(1) The file submitted is the data file, 0211mpd.xls. (2) These data are part of ICPSR's Publication-Related Archive and are distributed exactly as they arrived from the data depositor. ICPSR has not checked or processed this material. Users should consult the investigator(s) if further information is desired.

2003-04-18

2003-04-18

2018-02-15 The citation of this study may have changed due to the new version control system that has been implemented. The previous citation was:
  • Pakko, Michael R. Investment-Specific Technology Growth: Concepts and Recent Estimates. ICPSR01273-v1. Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2003-04-18. http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR01273.v1

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